Posts Tagged ‘MAMI’

The Day After

“I think you still love me, but we can’t escape the fact that I’m not enough for you. I knew this was going to happen. So I’m not blaming you for falling in love with another woman. I’m not angry, either. I should be, but I’m not. I just feel pain. A lot of pain. I thought I could imagine how much this would hurt, but I was wrong.”
― Haruki Murakami

Never had I ever thought that Infidelity as a film topic could be dealt with such poise, patience, and, character. However, when Auteur Hong Sang-soo handles a subject this delicate, the result is a poetic, meditative, melancholic, and a boozy drama.

In competition for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes this year, this is the 4th film by the Korean master in the past 8 months – and oh boy, he seems to be operating at the prime of his career.  Set around the life of a morose publisher and his affair with a woman, Bong-wan (Kwon) spends most of his screen time discussing love and life getting over shots of Soju. Little does the new employee Ah-reum (Kim) knows that she is replacing Bong-wan’s flame Chang-sook (Kim Sae-byuk). When Bong-wan’s wife (Cho yun-hee) finds a love poem written by Bong wan, she assumes that the mistress is Ah-reum. Ah-reum on the other end is almost a conscious reflection of bong-wan asking him strange and unsettling questions over, again some shots of soju. However, not all the characters in the film seem as layered as Bong-wan.

This film is moody, painful, and a nuanced understanding of infidelity. Barring the sudden zoom shots, this movie can surely get you drunk on mid-life crisis without the shots of Soju.

The Florida Project

Florida Project will remind you of Short Term 12. This is a gem from Sean Baker who proves that he is a seamless storyteller with fresh sensibilities to tackle complex issues with simple narratives. The colourfully lit frames of the film have dark underlying tensions which suck you into the milieu at the outskirts of Disneyland in Florida. As an audience, you enter the film with shots of kids creating havoc with their mischief and abuses but you are left weeping in the end.

There is something about kids, something about their innocence which has the power to fill the entire screen up. Moonee played by the young kid Brooklyn Prince will win laughs and break hearts across borders with her performance of a brash kid who is always upto adventures with her rebellious mom and ragtag buddies. Willem Dafoe gives a nuanced performance, speaking volumes about his maturity as an actor in top form. A scene where Willem Dafoe is seen requesting the birds to clear the drive way is an endearing sight which speaks for the wrinkles he has developed on his neck over the years.

The Florida project, CO-written, directed, and edited by Sean Baker is a very special film. The screenplay is incredibly fresh, believable, and breathing with Florida vocabulary. Tangerine filmmaker Baker again uses dynamic shots resulting into a charismatic storytelling technique. The Florida Project is an unmissable experience.

– Harsh Desai

(Senior Partner, Lowfundwala Productions (www.lowfundwala.com)

Siddharth Roy Kapur, Rohan Sippy, Ajay Bijli, Kaustubh Dhavse, Anurag Kashyap. Joined by MAMI Co-chairperson Kiran Rao, Festival Director Anupama Chopra and Creative Director Smriti Kiran

Mumbai Film Festival (MFF) has announced its lineup for this year’s edition of the fest. It’s a much awaited big cinema event for film lovers. The fest will run from 12 to 18th October and will screen 220 films from 49 countries in 51 languages. Anurag Kashyap’s Mukkabaaz will open the fest.

For segment wise details, do check out the embedded document

If you want to attend, click here, and do register. Don’t miss this one!

For most of us who are based in Bombay, the Mumbai Film Festival is an annual ritual. And since the fest always has a strong programming line-up, we keep telling our film fanatic friends who are based in other cities, that they must visit during the fest. Anand Kadam attended the fest for the first time this year. As he is back to conference calls and office emails, he looks back at the madness of those few days.

“Tonight I Can Write the Saddest Lines”

I wait for an hour in the queue, legs bent, shoulders slumped, sweat on my forehead, a water bottle and a jacket by my side – both to counter the air conditioner in the auditorium. This is not the sad part. The sad part is that I miss it. I miss the early rush. I miss the struggle of booking the slots. I miss the anxiety of missing other films. It was as if the universe decided to carve four days out of my life and paint them Neon. The screen lights up with snow and the name comes up – Pablo Larrain. Claps and whistles. Goosebumps. A biopic turned inside out where non-fiction and fiction intertwine and where the literal and the poetry marry to create beauty.

“Beauty is not everything, it’s the only thing”

Nicolas Winding not only believes it but lives through it as if this very line is his gospel; why else would he put everything aside in Neon Demon, from logic to rationality, to dazzle you with images that burn your retina and sound that pulsates your heart. Early morning dose of lesbian necrophilia and cannibalism. Yum. I am awestruck and angry at the same time. My stomach grumbles for breakfast. I eat a sandwich. The images keep disturbing me, and Jesse, who isn’t ashamed of her body, refuses to leave me.

“Shame isn’t a strong enough emotion to stop us doing anything at all.”

I count the number of people ahead of me. The counter on the screen reads thirty two. Touch and go. I feel restless as the queue starts moving. I reach the entrance but I am stopped. My heart breaks. I wait there. Hundred options run through my head as I scan the schedule. I am about to leave when I am allowed in. Beauty is not everything, it’s the only thing. Paul Verhoeven finds beauty in perversion. My brain in unable to process what it had witnessed. Elle is the exact opposite of everything I had ever seen. It challenged every notion I held of morality. It’s not immoral but it makes morality irrelevant.

“A stew needs time for the flavors to sink in and so do people”

What if there isn’t enough time or you have all the time in the world but something is amiss, like the flame is too slow or the wind is unaccounted for? How does he do it? Koreeda. How does he do it? I am exhausted. My eyes are heavier. My jacket feels heavier. The film starts. It ends. I don’t blink. A family drama that makes you laugh and is profound, where melancholy hides behind the surface. The constant struggle of not ending up like your father. It’s all there, rolled up into a bittersweet film.

“Why are there so many crying scenes? This isn’t a funeral”

I stand up for National Anthem for the umpteenth time as I prepare myself to watch a documentary where the citizens, in fear of being killed, must cry at the funeral of their leader. Weirdly though, I never thought I would be, in some sense, similar to Kim Jong-il. He loved movies and disliked his country’s cinema. What he does next is downright bizarre, hilarious, and tragic at the same time. He kidnaps South Korea’s Shin Sang-ok and his ex-wife Choi Eun-hee to fulfill his dream – to make better cinema. The irony of it all, Shin Sang-ok gets more freedom to create his cinema in North Korea than in South Korea. This entire story would have been unbelievable only if it weren’t a fact. North Korea, a country that needs to be saved.

Another country in Chaos. Egypt. I watch with my mouth wide open as the entire film is being shown from within a police van. Clash is an ultimate depiction of chaos and riots. No matter the ideology, people suffer. It’s an attempt to make us realize the only solution is for people to learn to coexist with people they hate.

Then there is India where child labor is abundant facilitating child traffickers.

Cecilia, a heartbreaking story of a tribal woman whose teenage daughter has died in mysterious circumstances. Apart from being a brilliant investigative journalism, the documentary also deals with moral dilemmas – would you rather accept monetary compensation or fight for your daughter’s justice? Pankaj Johar successfully shows the apathy of the entire system and makes you question your role in its contribution. By the end of it I feel absolutely numb. How can I break this vicious cycle when I myself am a spoke helping it rotate?

“I like to bring a bulldozer and ruin all of this city.”

“They ruined this city once, they built it again and now this is it.”

After traveling for more than an hour, I am stuffed up to my chest with Baghdadi’s daal gosht and fried aloo. The premier is late by an hour. I sit there in the stall of Regal wrapping myself with my jacket as if it were a blanket. The Director apologies for the delay and introduces the star-cast. Then it starts. The story moves in a leisure pace giving you ample time to absorb and soak in it. It slides through mundane parties and games. Then something strange happens. I see myself on the screen. I am twelve, asked to babysit my nephew who is all but four. I am busy watching something on the television as my nephew gulps down half a glass of old monk left on the table by my dad. I am to be blamed. Of course. I feel humiliated, families can do that, they can smother you. I am scarred and scared. Like Shutu, I am to carry everyone’s guilt. I want to scream at the screen and tell him to survive this. This will pass and will only be a distant memory. You will grow out of it. Great genius blooms late, remember?

“I want to witness your death and I’ll be the main character.”

My last show ends. It feels like an end of a pilgrimage. Where else do you find people, from eighteen to seventy, discussing films and only films, and a bit of gossip? Be it during lunch or dinner, in the queue, in the theater, in the loo. Discussing films with unknown people.

Heaven.

Films, Food, and beer.

What else do you want from life?

Just one slot a year dedicated to films. Isn’t much to ask.

(Based in Pune, Anand is a software engineer working in a bank. Priorities in life – Mutton, Wine and Cinema, in that order. He tweets @invokeanand)

And we have come to the second last day of the Mumbai Film Festival. Here’s quick wrap of all the films that we managed to catch.

If you are looking for our previous posts on reccos and reviews from Mumbai Film Festival, our Day 1 wrap is here, Day 2 is here, Day 3 is here, for Day 4 click here, and Day 5 is here.

For our notes on Movie Mela, click here. And click here to read about Cary Fukunaga session.

Nakom

The reason why I love attending film festivals is I get to see and learn about other cultures and countries. Kelly Daniela Norris and T. W. Pittman’s “Nakom” took me to a hidden rural town in Ghana and made me a part of their daily struggles. A simple story, on the lines of “Swades”, this is a very personal and sincere film. Story about going back to ones’ roots has been explored time and again but here, the filmmakers treat it in a very unassuming and simple manner. Truly an indie film with grainy night footage, non-actors performing to the best of their abilities, these flaws only add to the narrative to tell a very personal story about being torn between two worlds. Just wish the protagonist wasn’t so righteous and had some flaws in him. Nevertheless a gorgeous to look at with some great music. Here’s hoping this film gets a wide release so people can explore this side of Ghana. “Nakom” is probably a film that Ghana desperately needs.

Trapped

After the underwhelming “Lootera”, Vikramaditya Motwane has made one hell of a survival thriller in “Trapped”. What I loved the most was that it’s set in a metro like Mumbai where anything you can think of is available. Be it food, friends, enemies, dirty, crowd, empty nights and yet Shaurya (Rajkumar Rao) has nothing! Juxtaposing this mad city with the emptiness of a brand new flat was just a masterstroke. You can see the busy city, hear the noise but a call for help is useless! “Trapped” is also technically the strongest Hindi film this year. Motwane smartly uses aspect ratio to draw you into trapped environment and goes 2.35:1 during some really epic dream sequences. Everything here is just right, not more, not less and that’s the power of editing! Without a strong edit, a thriller is nothing. Too add to the awesomeness is the mind blowing score by Alokananda Dasgupta. Terrific stuff!

Mihir @mihirbdesai

My Life as a Courgette

Icares is sent to an orphanage after he accidentally kills his mother in an unfortunate yet hilarious accident. He meets a bunch of other orphans there and after some initial hospitality, he develops a bond with them, especially with Simon, the resident bully. Camille enters the scene after a few days and Courgette falls for her.
This gorgeously rendered stop motion Mary & Max-ish feel wali French language film is Swiss official entry for the 89th Academy awards. I’m so glad I ended my day with this after starting it with the eerie Hounds of Love. Had a huge grin on my face throughout the 65 minutes of this absolute cuteness overload.

– Avinash @filmworm85

Multiple Maniacs

On the surface, Multiple Maniacs is about Lady Divine and her motley crew, luring unsuspecting suburban folks to her show ‘The Cavalcade of Perversion’, the catch being the audience will have never seen something so ‘nasty’, so ‘filthy’. The show consists of acts such as ‘puke eater’, ‘faggots’ kissing and alike. At the end of the show, the unsuspecting audience is looted off their money and belongings on gunpoint.

Scratch a layer deeper, the film is about John Waters luring sweet suburban folks (yes, even us Mumbaikars) in to his own version of ‘Cavalcade of Perversion’. The film is like looking in to a mirror but only seeing a more grotesque version of your staring back. The film is truly twisted at its core. All institutions of our current day society such as education, family etc. are torn in to thither, but none as much as ‘Religion’. If you are even remotely religious, stay away from this, you have been warned. But if in case you have a thick skin, you are in for a bizarre treat which hasn’t aged a single day in the 46 years since it first released. Mr. John Waters, you have attention as well as our curiosity! P.S. Multiple Maniacs will be screened on Day 7 of at La Reve, Bandra. Do catch if possible.

– Aditya @TheRadiowala

Death In Sarajevo 

Danis Tanovic’s new film is an Altmanesque satire, a drama of ideas until it isn’t. Cash strapped and desperate, a hotel prepares to host a function commemorating the hundredth anniversary of the first World War while its meagre staff readies for a strike, while at the same time tensions flare between a Serb and a Bosnian woman interviewing him on the rooftop. The hotel becomes a fascinating backdrop for exploring worker rights and capitalism while Tanovic brilliantly uses the rooftop sequence to depict the dissonance between humanity and politics as the two warring parties display a subtle sexual chemistry. A prerequisite knowledge of European history, specifically of the Slavic countries, is recommended.

The Untamed

I didn’t watch Mexican filmmaker Amat Escalante’s Heli at last year’s MAMI but I heard people berating it while riding the elevator up to the screens, an old bearded man ranted about how it had gone too far. I never got around to watching it but a viewing of Untamed has all but ensured that I’ll seek it out.

It’s a bizarre lo-fi sci-fi domestic drama about a mother of two and her husband who is in an abusive affair with her gay brother. The science fiction elements mostly take a backseat to the human drama but when it’s there, it’s deliciously done, calling to mind Andrzej Zuwalski’s Possession, with its creature design and erotica. There’s some allusions to the misogyny and homophobia in Mexican society but I’ve little context for it. On some level, I’m in love with the film, but I’m not entirely sure why. It’s definitely not a film for everyone.

– Anubhav @psemophile

 

Trapped

This MAMI has been a bit of a disappointment in terms of the new works by revered and trusted directors. A lot of great filmmakers produced average to even abysmal works. Somehow, despite that, I hadn’t lost even an iota of excitement for Trapped, because Motwane has my unshakable faith.

Trapped is a very simple survival drama, simple as survival dramas go. I’ll divulge as few details as I can, since even a trailer has not come out and I do not know what can be a potential spoiler to you. The film boils down to this – a man gets trapped in his own apartment, due to his own carelessness and actions performed in desperation. He has to survive, and find a way out. This isn’t any apartment, it’s an apartment in an unoccupied building. The whys aren’t something I’ll get into, suffice it to say that nothing seemed contrived. The writing felt utterly grounded, the protagonist utterly relatable.

The greatest thing that the movie does is that by virtue of it being set in Bombay, it taps into a contradictory claustrophobia that all of us who’ve lived here have felt at some point of time. You’re just one person in a sea of people, and despite the sheer population and closeness with which we live, it can be the most daunting task to be heard, to be seen, to be found. Along with that, the film deals with a lot other fears that you or I may have while living in this city. The shut out balconies. Animals. The blind trust that everything will work as planned. In the end, and this is the truth which we all need to know, when the shit hits the fan, we have only ourselves to rely on to clean it all up.

The film is not at all lengthy, the pacing is solid, the editing practically flawless. Few moments feel ripe with tension, not just in terms of “what the fuck is going to go wrong next?” but also in terms of “oh my God what is this guy going to do next?”. If you’ve seen enough movies, you’ll start trying to predict all sorts of scenarios, and Trapped sometimes lands where the predictions land, sometimes it does not, but regardless of either case, it does not feel stupid or watered down one bit. You truly feel the basic survival instinct kick in, and the battle between surviving and already set fears. Forgive me for speaking in such abstract terms, any more specifics could ruin the film for you. I enjoyed it as much as I did because I knew NOTHING about it. The thing about survival dramas is that it’s set in such a confined space and it’s got such little space, it’s easy to lose track or momentum. Tedious flashbacks, slacking of pace, repetitive tropes, all of those are pitfalls which Motwane and team effortlessly and continuously avoid. There are parts where the humour isn’t obvious, but you laugh inside. And even more effortlessly, the story eases us back into the scenario of tension. There were quite a few instances where my balls were in my mouth, pardon me for the lack of a better euphemism. Anything said about this film CANNOT be complete without mentioning the hero of the hour and a half, Rajkumar Rao. The man has proven himself time and again, but I firmly believe that he has outdone himself. Have you ever screamed yourself hoarse? You know what your voice sounds like after that. This man has actually acted that out. You see a rabid survival instinct in his eyes develop gradually as the film progresses. In the sequences preceding the entrapment, you see the awkwardness, introversion, infatuation and pure love. And then you see the most basic human nature take over. It takes an immensely skilled actor to bring all of that into one character, and this film would’ve fallen like an unstable jenga tower had it not been for Rajkumar Rao’s acting.

I believe this film would not have been the way it is had it been set in any other city. This is a story of a man surviving in Bombay. In a hunger and thirst induced stupor, he hallucinates about how joyful it would feel to travel in a sweaty, crowded local train compartment again, how joyful it would feel to argue with a BEST bus conductor again, to jump into the sea at Chowpatti beach. The barricaded balconies, the “jugaad” that we are used to seeing and doing, everything forms an integral part of the story, or character, or both. Motwane made a coming of age film that was a masterpiece. Then he adapted an O Henry story and made it into a period drama. Now, he’s made a survival story that’s stripped bare, and yet, its not devoid of magic. That’s Motwane for you, and that’s Trapped for you. Trapped is right up there with Red Turtle for me as the best that MAMI has to offer this year.

Light Music

An experimental “Experience” of sorts, involving two 16mm projectors, to showcase the way sound is used in celluloid. This one was a half an hour long experience for the curious, for the die hard cinema lover. Seeing a 16mm projector in the flesh is beautiful, to say the least, but the best part about the whole thing was that the two projectors were kept opposing each other, one in each end of the cinema hall, and with the fog effects, the rays of the projectors felt like they were having some sort of a magical duel. Or maybe I’m just indulging myself here. The images projected were that of the soundtrack part of the celluloid. We were supposed to hear, as well as see, what the sound aspect of a film is, or was. However, after maybe 10 minutes, I got bored so I stepped out.

When Two Worlds Collide

A documentary about the battle between an indigenous community and the government for the Amazon, the atrocities that can and are committed in the name of “progress”, and the price some people are willing to pay for the greater good. It is a harrowing tale, no doubt. And it is ever relevant, as whatever be the struggle, the core of it is the same everywhere – standing up for what’s right. However, this documentary had some strong pacing issues in the start. By the time it picked up the pace, I’d lost interest (in the film, not the subject), so it wouldn’t be fair if I said anything more.

Achyuth Sankar

 (Pics – Varun Grover/Jio MAMI)

Sin Nombre, True Detective, Beasts Of No Nation – These three titles on a cv are enough to impress anyone, even the ones who are difficult to please. Thanks to Mumbai Film Festival, filmmaker Cary Fukunaga is one of the guests at the fest this year. Filmmaker Zoya Akhtar was in conversation with him. We are hoping that the video will be out soon. Till then here are some interesting notes from the session of CARYFUCKYEAH! (the way we like to say it)

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As most of us at mFC have been busy watching back to back films at the Mumbai Film Festival, none of us could manage to attend the 2-day Movie Mela. But thanks to Suchin Mehrotra, all is not gone. He attended the Day 2 of the mela and here’s a post on the same.

(click on any pic to start the slide show)

What’s particularly interesting about the Jio MAMI film festival as against other global film festivals, is how it showcases facets of world cinema and indie cinema, but also merges this with a celebration of mainstream Hindi cinema. The Movie Mela is an example of the latter and described as ‘India’s only movie carnival’. I chose to attend day 2 of the Mela, given I found it had the more appealing line-up of events; however I was also really aware of the full day of film watching being sacrificed.

Session 1: Virtual Reality and Filmmaking

A fascinating session hosted by the charismatic Shakun Batra on virtual reality and its implications and applications to storytelling, featuring panelists Gabo Arora – creative director at the UN, filmmaker Anand Gandhi and Raja Koduri – the man behind the VFX of the gargantuan Baahubali. The discussion explored what exactly virtual reality is and the opportunities it offers the world of filmmaking, with words and phrases like ‘immersive’ and ‘you-are-physically-in-the-story’ being frequently thrown around. Although the panel repeatedly proclaimed, almost matter-of-factly, that VR is a game-changer and the definitive future of filmmaking, I remain unconvinced given the same was said years ago about IMAX and 3D, the hype behind which eventually fizzled out. However, this is still no-doubt a fascinating new dimension to the medium of cinema, and definitely one which all film buffs should be aware of. In fact, most Hollywood studios are investing in a VR arm of some sort, with big names likes Steven Spielberg said to be toying with the medium in their future projects.

Gabo Arora’s presence on the panel was for both his renowned VR films like Clouds Over Sidra, as well as his insight on the implications of VR on the humanitarian field. Research conducted on the effectiveness of charity donation collectors who randomly approach people on the street for a donation, found that only 1 in 12 ever receive funds. However, by giving each of these collectors a VR headset which allowed them to show a short film such as Clouds Over Sidra to passersby, the chances of receiving a donation almost doubled. Simply put, people were more generous when given a visual experience of the very conditions they were being asked to help change. Arora also announced live at the panel that the UN would be picking up Gandhi’s VR production, Cost of Coal, and including it in their distribution network, making it India’s first ever VR studio acquisition. Aside from this, Gandhi made a wonderful appeal to one and all asking for anyone who has a meaningful story to tell using VR, should just walk into his company’s Mumbai office to pitch ideas, and if they connect with it, they will provide all the necessary tools and infrastructure to go out and make the film.

However, as interesting as the possibilities of VR may be, the session went on for far too long, with a far greater focus on technology than filmmaking, and proved largely exhausting by the end. Suffice to say, I was strongly craving the feeling of a movie theatre by this point.

Session 2: Short film premier: Ouch by Neeraj Pandey

Ouch – the aptly titled comedy, starring Pooja Chopra and Manoj Bajpayee – who is fast becoming the face of the Indian short film, proved to be a fun little film which hinges on Bajpayee’s great comic timing and keeps you chuckling. Apart from some overpowering music and the slightly stretched narrative, it’s a refreshing change to the recent slew of short films made by mainstream filmmakers. However, I couldn’t help but feel this didn’t qualify to be it’s own standalone session considering the film could be viewed on Youtube at a later stage. (It was released on Youtube later the same day).

 

Session 3: Director’s panel – In conversation with Zoya Akhtar, Vishal Bhardwaj, Gauri Shinde, Shoojit Sarcar and Rohit Shetty

Undoubtedly the session that made the entire day worth it and how! A pure cinematic delight that had me giddy with excitement. Hosted by Anupama Chopra and Rajeev Masand, it was an enjoyable mix of focus on the movies and filmmaking, as much as it was on the more light-hearted aspects of personal experiences. The delightful discussion covered their behaviours and demeanor on set, their attitude towards stress, their relationship with failure as well as their approach to dealing with actors.  A few excerpts and fun facts from the session:

When asked what the best advice on filmmaking she ever received, Zoya Akhtar recalled something Mira Nair (whom she has assisted in the past) had told her about three things to never forget –

  1. Always be true to the story you are telling
  2. Never let go of your femininity in an effort to be the boss. You can wear  a skirt and lipstick and still be the boss
  3. Never hook up with your actors.

Rohit Shetty was in full form and stole the show with his frank and direct answers. Although I don’t hold his brand of cinema in very esteem at all, I couldn’t help but respect the man for his honesty which included stating that ‘Golmaal 2 was a crap film’, ‘The villain in Singham 2 just didn’t work’, and admitting that he didn’t think much of Dilwale particularly because of the love story arc between SRK and Kajol which let the film down.

A few fun facts:

  • Shoojit Sarcar has special-made Darjeeling tea that is specifically plucked and delivered from Darjeeling for him which he sips on all day on set
  • Zoya Akhtar’s one golden rule on her sets is “strictly no littering” to ensure the crew respect all the locations they shoot at.
  • Vishal Bhardwaj maintains that none of his films have ever set the box office on fire or even gone onto make money, which is just startling to consider! He said the most any film has ever managed is recovering its money.
  • None of the directors claim to drink coffee which was a particularly shocking revelation given how stressful a job of a director is, and more so given how much caffeine I had to ingest just to be able to make it to the event and hear them speak.

Session 4: In conversation with Shahid Kapoor

Although it is in no way an easy task to follow up a panel discussion featuring some of the exciting filmmakers in the country, Shahid Kapoor’s session proved to be equally as engaging, largely down to how candid the actor was about his career. He openly discussed how the majority of his films aren’t ‘good films’ as such, and how he’s really come into his own in the last few years and is clear about the kinds of films he wants to be a part of. It was ultimately hard not to be charmed and I’m certainly excited to see what the reinvigorated actor offers up with his future projects. He is next to be seen in Vishal Bhardwaj’s Rangoon followed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s Padmavati.

Overall the Mela proved to be fine day for any cinephile that helped provide a much-needed dose of variety to the festival proceedings!

(Suchin Mehrotra is a freelance writer and critic, who left the corporate world to pursue his love of cinema because he watched one too many films for his own good. He is based out of Bombay and can be reached at @suchin545)

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It’s down to last 2 days of the festival. If you are looking for our previous posts on reccos and reviews from Mumbai Film Festival, our Day 1 wrap is here, Day 2 is here, Day 3 is here, and for Day 4 click here.

endless-poetry

Endless Poetry

This was my first theatrical Alejandro Jodorowsky experience and I was blown away! Easily the best film I saw on Day 5 and one of the best of the fest. Jodorowsky makes an autobiographical film which is a lot more than just striking visuals. A satire of sorts, he narrates his story about growing up and comments on the political, cultural pressures of Chile. Jodorowsky does it his way, through OTT performances, set pieces, make up and twisted humour. This is not just for hardcore Jodorowsky fans but for everyone! His most accessible and relatable film to date. Think Udaan meets Boyhood directed by the master Jodorowsky. Operatic and poetic in its execution, the visual design is unlike anything I have seen in recent times. In-camera set changes, high contrast images, musical quirks. A delight to watch! Now please make “DUNE” soon, Alejandrito! 

Mihir @mihirbdesai

Kaagaz Ki Kashti

Have you seen Pancham. Yes? Okay, then take RD Burman out and put Jagjit Singh in the same template and you have Kaagaz Ki Kashti and that’s perhaps the only fault of it, if you wanna nitpick. If you haven’t seen Pancham, even better. Director Brahmanand Singh weaves this legend’s biography from interviews, excerpts, old clips & sepia tinted pictures, nostalgia inducing trivia and feel your throat choking and eyes moistening.

Pancham worked big time for me. I loved the man and I loved the way Mr B told his story. Just like RD, I’ve grown up listening to Jagjit Saab, I mean all of us have. Even if you’re not a fan, you couldn’t have missed his songs playing in Hostel Daaru parties. Just listening to his silken sensous voice in a Dolby digital surround sound system (for the first time in my life) is worth it.

On top of that, this one gives you a window into this man’s jovial personality even though he made a career out of singing sad Ghazals. How he rejuvenated the ghazal scene, how he gave it a new language, how he took Ghazals to an average Indian household. How the loss of his son broke him and how he bounced back. It shows you the human Jagjit hidden behind the Maestro Jagjit.

It perhaps may not be an extraordinaryly path-breaking film, but the subject matter itself is so fascinating and exuberant that you can’t not be floored by it. It took me to a place I hadn’t visited since a long time. Just like the man’s singing, this one touched me in ways very personal.

It’s gonna get a PVR release soon, as told by the director in the post Q&A session. Don’t miss it.

– Avinash @filmworm85

 Sand Storm

Director Elite Zexer’s mother, a stills photographer asked Zexer to join her when she began photographing Bedouin women from various villages in the Israeli Negev desert. This adventure led to encounters with incredible women and spurred years of writing, which culminated in Sand Storm. Set in Southern Israel, it gives us an authentic picture of  life in a Bedouin village replete with its contact with modernity. It opens with the 18-year-old Layla driving the family’s truck under the supervision of her father, far from the remote village. As they near the hamlet, they switch seats. Zexer accurately captures the cultural specifics of the place  like the sex-segregated wedding function, Jalila baking bread on top of an oven and the collision of tradition with modernity. It is these details that tell the story and effectively ‘show more than tell’ . You would still wish that the story was also more revelatory. You would wish that it plumbed the depths allowing us to invest more in the mother-daughter dynamic.

Jalila is hosting the marriage of her husband to a second, much younger wife. As she tries to conceal her inner turmoil, she discovers her daughter Layla’s forbidden affair with a boy.

The revolt of the women in the film is quiet yet resolute. Lammis Amar conveys this self-assured feistiness with her doe eyes. At the heart of it, Sand Storm tells the story of a mother and a daughter, how they adopt each other’s perspectives and despite the fire within, lose their personal battles. Though Zexer is a new cinematic voice to watch out for with the emotionally rife scene design, the subtlety of the film leaves you wanting more from what could have been a story of turbulent interpersonal relationships.

Dipti @kuhukuro

The Untamed

I didn’t watch Mexican filmmaker Amat Escalante’s Heli at last year’s MAMI but I heard people berating it while riding the elevator up to the screens, an old bearded man ranted about how it had gone too far. I never got around to watching it but a viewing of Untamed has all but ensured that I’ll seek it out.
It’s a bizarre lo-fi sci-fi domestic drama about a mother of two and her husband who is in an abusive affair with her gay brother. The science fiction elements mostly take a backseat to the human drama but when it’s there, it’s deliciously done, calling to mind Andrzej Zuwalski’s Possession, with its creature design and erotica. There’s some allusions to the misogyny and homophobia in Mexican society but I’ve little context for it. On some level, I’m in love with the film, but I’m not entirely sure why. It’s definitely not a film for everyone.

Endless Poetry

Filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s latest film is probably his least impressive. All his films are indulgent and do not adhere to any set rules of cinema. Rather, they are drawn from his years and varied career as a poet, mime, magician, mystic, actor, writer and graphic novelist. Jodorowsky is such a unique artist that to see his flagrant indulgence in any form is always a pleasure. I do not exaggerate when I say that every frame in his films are crammed to the gills with metaphor and symbolism. While all this can be overwhelming, Jodorowsky always manages to eke out a common beauty, a transcendent whole that makes it all work. Endless Poetry picks up right after Dance of Reality, continuing the proposed five movie long autobiography of the director. While Dance was about Jodorowsky’s early years and his father’s hate for Pinochet, this one concerns itself with his later teenage years which yields middling results. It just doesn’t work here. Christopher Doyle’s cinematography exists as a sharp contrast to what usually is the beautiful tackiness of Jodorowsky’s art design and is quite an ill fit. Jodorowsky’s son Adan plays him in the film but he pales in comparison to Jeremiah Herkowitz in the first film, and pales, especially, in comparison to his father, Alejandro, in the few scenes he shares with him. What is particularly off putting is the total lack of humility Jodorowsky exhibits, with the film constantly proclaiming how great a poet the filmmaker is.

This might make an interesting watch for the Jodorowsky virgin and fans will watch nonetheless. The next film in the series will follow Jodorowsky to France, in a more interesting time in his life, and perhaps to a better film.

– Anubhav @psemophile

Apprentice

Apprentice could very well have been a Gulzar or a Manto short story (resisting the pun here involving director’s name — Boo). It is about the emotionally conflicting choices one has to make in dire situations. But it is more personal than political. It is an after-crime story. What happens with their family after someone has committed a crime and has even been punished for it. Does the punishment stop with the perpetrator? It is an after-effects tale where the tale has turned but the cycle goes on. A former soldier has newly joined as a guard in a state prison. He is hiding something about his lost father and then he finds a father-figure in the prison’s executioner. The plot is so predictable that you know right from the beginning what the last shot of the film will be. But it doesn’t matter. You wait to see that. It’s about “how” more than “what”. Engrossing dramatic build-ups, searing emotional tension… everything photographed effectively by Benoit Soler who also shot Singapore’s Oscar entry of 2013,  Anthony Chen’s brilliant Ilo Ilo. Chen and now Junfeng are the two young filmmakers from Singapore to watch out for.

Anup @thePuccaCritic

Ahamaq

What separates Mani Kaul’s films from other Indian parallel cinema exponents is the visual eye. Kaul’s flair for rhythm, mood and images, and the meandering nature of his drama made him a very significant filmmaker at par with the world cinema auteurs.

I knew what to expect of Ahamaq, adapted from Dostoevsky’s ‘The Idiot’, and also the context of films by FTII passouts of the time. In a way, this film is a cinematography achievement. But Kaul’s disregard for performances and drama hurts Ahamaq, mostly because of the length of this feature. There’s only so much unwanted, dated poetic surrealism you can take. I’ll still recommend you to go this and figure this out for yourself. Anup Singh (‘Qissa’) co-wrote and was also the 1st AD on the film. I feel, Kaul would have made a great 21st century filmmaker.

(PS – Before SRK laughed that laugh in Darr, he did it in Ahamaq. In abundance. Mani Kaul was a visionary, in more ways than one)

Bhaskar @bolnabey

Staying Vertical (Dir: Alain Guiraudie)

Crazy doesn’t even begin to describe this film. Haven’t seen many other head-fuck films at MAMI this year (Wailing, Wild, Untamed though did see the brilliant Endless Poetry and The Lure) but STAYING VERTICAL was one of the most rewarding festival experiences yet for me. It’s a film that makes you work – to try and decode the allegories at play. Though the initial hour feels like a template art-house deep but frustrating experience but as soon as you get the key to the metaphors, it turns into a darkly humorous take on *won’t spoil what*.

Fun fact: The film has a lot of dick-shots and with every such shot, at least 3 people walked out of the screening. I figured that different people have different tolerance levels on the number of dicks they can see in a film. Some were like – “2 dekh liye, ab teesra nahin dekh sakte.” Respect

वरुण @varungrover