Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) has unveiled the first set of film titles premiering in the Gala and Special Presentations programmes in this year’s edition of the fest. Three Indian films will have there world premiere at Toronto. All the three films are part of Special Presentations.

Anurag Kashyap’s latest film Mukkebaaz is titled The Brawler for the fest edition. The 145-min long film is about a lower caste boxer struggling to make his mark on the boxing world. The film stars Vineet Singh in the lead role.

Hansal Mehta’s Omerta recounts the story of infamous British-born terrorist Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, who kidnapped and murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in 2002. It stars Raj Kummar Rao in the lead and is 96 minutes long.

The third one is Bornilla Chatterjee’s The Hungry. It relocates Shakespeare’s bloody tragedy Titus Andronicus to modern-day India, where corruption, greed, and revenge run rampant at an extravagant wedding.

Tilt Shift Labs is organising its first ever certified workshop with National film award winning director Kamal Swaroop. The workshop titled ‘Grammar of Film Direction’ is a two-weekend intensive workshop for amateurs/students of cinema who are looking towards making a career in films.

– In two short weekends, students will be instructed on the basics of writing, directing, camera, and each student will write a short film project which will be guided and mentored by Kamal Swaroop.

– About the director:
Swaroop is a well acclaimed filmmaker and screenwriter. He graduated from Film and Television Institute of India in 1974, and later on did his postgraduate studies at the Institute. In 1982, he assisted Sir Richard Attenborough in the filming of Gandhi. His feature, Om-Dar-B- Dar (1988) is still considered a path breaking film, and it has a massive cult following among cinephiles.
Swaroop’s career, spanning 42 years, covers a broad range of films, channel promos for Channel V India, ads and Radio Spots. In 2014, he directed The Battle of Benaras, produced by Medient, and went on to release Tracing Phalke in 2015 for Films Division of India. Later on, he made Pushkar Puran (2016), and Atul (2016), based on the world renowned Dadaist artist Atul Dodiya.
Battle for Benaras premiered at Cinema Du Reel, Paris, while Atul premiered at the Cochin Biennale. He is currently working on a musical, Miss Palmolive All Night Cabaret and The Third Police Man, a metaphysical murder mystery.

Weekend I 

Session I
Camera Angles
Scene, Shot & Sequence
Types Of Camera Angles: Objective, Subjective, Point-Of-View
Objective Camera Angles
Subjective Camera Angles
Subject Size
Subject Angle
Camera Height
Extreme Long Shot
Long Shot
Medium Shot
Typical Two Shots
Close-Up
Inserts
Descriptive Shots
High Angle
Low Angle
Angle Plus Angle
Dutch Angle
Selecting Area And Viewpoint
Other Angles

Weekend I

Session II
Continuity
Cinematic Time And Space
Filming The Action (Controlled And Uncontrolled)
Filming Techniques (Master Scene And Triple Take)
Screen Direction (Dynamic And Static)
Neutral Shots
Reverse Shots
Screen Travel
Pictorial Transitions (Fades, Dissolves And, Wipes)
Sound Transitions

Weekend II

Session I
Process Of Writing
Back Story
Internal Need
Inciting Incident
External Goal
Preparation
Opposition
Self Revelation
Obsession
Battle
Resolution

Weekend II

Session II
Process Of Writing
Discussing Individual Scripts
Story Boarding Process
Production Planning
The Need For Story-Telling
Visualization Strategies
Dramatic Strategies
Characterization Strategies
Dialogue Strategies
Melodrama, Docudrama, Hyperdrama
The Experimental Narrative

Dates : July 29 – 30 | Aug 5 – 6 |

Time : 10AM-5pm

Seats : Only 15

Venue : Lowfundwala Productions, Andheri (West)
Bungalow No.96, SVP Nagar, MHADA, 4 Bungalows,Andheri West, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400053

Fees : Rs 8470

– For further details, and to book your seat, click here.

 

Well known cinematographer Shanker Raman makes his directorial debut with Gurgaon. Though Versova’s rumour mills suggest he might have ghost-directed one of the most acclaimed indies (insert wink-wink-nudge-nudge emoji). Produced by JAR Pictures, the film stars Akshay Oberoi, Ragini Khanna, Pankaj Tripathi, Aamir Bashir and Shalini Vatsa.

Here’s the official synopsis –

Kehri Singh, a real estate baron, runs his business ‘Preet Real Estate’ in his daughter’s name. She is his lucky charm and the apple of his eye. Kehri Singh’s oldest son Nikki Singh, is often side-lined by his father as a brash, insolent, good for nothing, who only brings bad luck. Driven by his need to pay off a large debt to a local bookie, Nikki Singh sets off a chilling chain of events, that unwittingly force his cold-blooded father to confront his buried past.

Gurgaon, is a cautionary tale that reminds us of the famous saying, what goes around, comes around.

It was selected at Work-In-Progress Lab of NFDC Film Bazaar in 2015, won the Prasad DI Award in the fiction feature category.

Here’s the film’s trailer :

Most of us saw Lipstick Under My Burkha at last year’s Mumbai Film Festival (MFF). Since then, the film has been doing the fest rounds and winning accolades internationally. On home ground though, it has been the exactly opposite scene. Battle with CBFC went for long, and then the task to find a proper release and distribution partner. Ekta Kapoor came on-board and gave the much needed boost to make it look visible. The film is finally in theatres this friday.

Here’s our recco post on the film, written by Raj Kumari. It was written last year after the MFF screening.

No Male Rescuers

Lipstick Under My Burkha (LUMB) was one of the best films I saw at MAMI 2016 – a bold & honest take on female sexuality. All four protagonists are females (how often that happens in India?) so it can be easily said that it is about female sexuality but I felt at the deepest level it is not. And I am so happy about it being not so.

But still it shows the different perceptions about female sexuality in four different stages of a women’s life through four characters Rehana Saeed (a college girl), Leela (a young lady of so-called marriageable age), Shireen Aslam (a middle-aged married women) and Usha Bua ji (an elderly woman).

The film explores their desires, fantasies, and struggle to own their heartbreaks with such honesty and poignant sensitivity that it’s impossible not to see your own secrets in them.

And even after crossing so many slippery alleys of this topic of female sexuality and repression when it becomes very easy (and even cathartic) to take sides by providing a rescuer for these characters, this film allows itself not to take such a decisive stand and sticks to its POV of just being a witness. The film doesn’t rescue them, it just lets them be. The focus remains tight on the process of suppression only, and hence the core of sexuality comes out blazingly clear.

And what is it?

Sexuality is never about body. And more primarily about male or female body. It can not be. As it involves both male and female energies, whatever be the outer form of the body, male or female or any other gender. Sexuality is about being free, being open, being whole in your presence which generally manifests as being with your own body. And of course, this openness and freedom can come through wearing what you like, smoking, being explicitly exposing or demanding sex openly (some of the tropes repeatedly used/reinforced in our films to show a ‘liberated’ woman). But being sexually liberated is further about understanding that these are just few symbols of freedom against respective symbols of suppression. They ALONE are NOT freedom. Yes, they do serve till some deeper grounds of being open with the self is found. And the film attempts to take us to that depth too.

(SPOILERS AHEAD) 

It defines the core of freedom in the scene where Bua-ji owns her desires, and her ownership of them in front of all who used to respect her. She didn’t feel any shame, grudge or pity. She showed courage to assemble all of her torn, broken, humiliated self in her arms and took shelter in her bedroom calmly and with the same ownership. There were male oppressors but there was no male rescuer in the film, and this itself says how deeply mature the intent of the film is. I loved the film a little extra for this one golden aspect.

And in the last scene, how beautifully it showed that such a place of courage becomes a platform for all such courageous hearts to identify with their struggle. A platform to make mistakes, comparing your struggles with others, and finally seeing the commonality of self ownership as the final rescue.
Do watch it. And let us know what you thought about the film.

Ritesh Batra’s new film, Our Souls at Night, will have its world premiere at Venice International Film Festival in an out-of-competition slot. The film stars Robert Redford and Jane Fonda. Both the actors will also be honored with Golden Lions for Lifetime Achievement at the 74th edition of the fest.

Based on the novel by Kent Haruf and adapted for screen by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, Our Souls At Night is set in Colorado, and begins when Addie Moore (Fonda) pays an unexpected visit to a neighbor Louis Waters (Redford). Her husband died years ago, as did his wife, and in such a small town, they’d been neighbors for decades but had little contact. Netflix is launching the film globally next year. (via Deadline)

The fest will run from Aug. 30 till Sept. 9, 2017

The Song of Scorpions directed by Anup Singh, starring Irrfan Khan and Golshifteh Farahani will have its world première at Locarno Film Festival. The festival is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year.

The Song of Scorpions is a story of twisted love, revenge and the redemptive power of a song. Nooran, carefree and defiantly independent, is a tribal woman learning the ancient art of healing from her grandmother, a revered scorpion-singer. When Aadam, a camel trader in the Rajasthan desert, hears her sing, he falls desperately in love. But even before they can get to know each other better, Nooran is poisoned by a brutal treachery that sets her on a perilous journey to avenge herself and find her song.

The Locarno Film Festival runs from Aug. 2-12, 2017.

The National Film Development Corporation officially announces Call for Entries for the 11th Year of Filmbazaar Co-Production Market.

The Co-Production Market presents a list of curated projects to the national and international film professionals attending Film Bazaar.

– The Market kicks off with Open Pitch where participants present their projects through Video Pitches to an audience of investors, producers and financiers.

– The four days of the market are earmarked for one on one meetings specially scheduled for each project.

Over the years, the dedicated team has honed its skills for matching projects with the right delegates. Dedicated online and print catalogues consisting of all project details are available for Film Bazaar attendees interested in Co-Production Market projects. The market also conducts an orientation session to familiarize participants to Open Pitch as well as the working of the Co-Production Market and Film Bazaar.

– Full length fiction feature projects with South Asian themes are invited to apply.

– The Early Bird Deadline for submissions is July 5th, 2017.

– The Regular Deadline is August 7th 2017.

– The Extended Deadline is August 21st 2017.

– The Market will be held between 20 – 24th November, 2017 at Film Bazaar, Goa.

– Click www.filmbazaarindia.com for Application Forms and more details

– For further queries, write to: coproduction@filmbazaarindia.com

CPM Projects Over the Years:

 

Lipstick Under My Burkha (CPM 2013),  Newton, Amit Masurkar (CPM 2015), Mantra, Nicholas Khargaonkar, Song of the Scorpions (Anup Singh CPM 2013), Beyond the Known World (Pan Nalin, CPM 2012), Lady of the Lake, Manto, Court, Chauthi Koot, Titli, Liar’s Dice, Arunoday, Highway,Television, Chauranga, Qissa, LSD, Paltadacho Munis, That girl with Yellow Boots, Anurag Kashyap Deool, Karma, Shanghai, Miss Lovely, Mumbai Cha Raja, As the River Flows, Shor in the City, 28.

– Some of the people who have attended the Co Production Market at Film Bazaar are Chedomir Kolar [ Producer No Man’s Land], Mustofa Sarwar Farooki [Director Television], Michael Werner [Fortissimo Films ], Chris Paton [San Sebastian Film Festival], Christian Jeune [Cannes Film Festival], Kristen Niehuus [Medien Board, Berlin-Brandenburg] Remi Burah [Arte France Cinema], Anurag Kashyap, Madhu Mantena, Manish Mundhra, Sooni Taraporewala, Sabiha Sumar [Director Khamosh Pani], Guneet Monga, Nandita Das, Govind Nihalani, Shyam Benegal, Pablo Bertolini [Venice Film Festival], Charles Tesson [Cemaine de la Crtique Cannes Film Festival], Aviva Silver [NEA cinema, Belgium], Anup Singh [Director Quissa],Catherine Dussart [Producer Chautih Koot France], Ramesh Sippy, Kabir Khan, Sheeladitya Bora, Marco Muller, [Beijing Film Festival], Benjamin Illos [Director’s Fortnight, Cannes]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

किनारा में एक चीज़ तो कमाल की थी. जो कहावत है ना कि ’बाप का माल’,
तो बाप का माल बहुत चुराया मैंने” 

Pancham

Without any doubts, one can say that Sachin Dev Burman is one of the greatest music directors of all time. His musical creations are forever, but his most special creation was his son “Pancham”, yet another musical genius whose creations stood the test of time. Pancham was born on this day 78 years ago on June 27th 1939. Pancham’s destiny was given a definite path when Dada Burman took him along from Kolkata to Mumbai, despite reservations from Pancham’s mother & naani. Pancham began his music learning and soon started contributing to Dada’s music at an early age. Dada Burman used one of Pancham’s tune in ‘Funtoosh’ for the song “Ae meri topi palat ke aa“.

Pancham continued to be a big support to Dada Burman as an assistant music director, both officially and unofficially.  A lot of musical pieces from 60s and 70s of Dada Burman carry a significant and visible Pancham. Pyaasa‘s theme for Mala Sinha, the unforgettable Harmonica play in “Hai apna dil to awaara“, the title and dance music in Teen Deviyaan along with his harmonica, to name just a few.  One of the most significant achievement of Pancham’s career was that he could come out of the shadow of the very successful father and created his own independent space with his distinct style, sound, and thirst for innovation. Yet one can always find a lot of traces of Dada Burman’s music in Pancham’s composition in the later years. Pancham had made an honest confession about it in a radio show, admitting that he recycled/reused a lot of his father’s tunes. Much more than a father-son relationship,  it was a creative collaboration of two brilliant minds supplementing & complementing each other in the musical journey where each of them supported the cause of other.    Today we explore his “Baap Ka Maal” in this post. Join in.

1.  Kandibo na Fagun gele – SD Burman / Abke Na Saawan Barse – Kinara 

Dada Burman sang and composed the Bengali non-film song in earlier years of his career. Pancham reused the tune to create Abke na saawan barse in Kinara (1977)

 

 

2. Aami Chinu Eka – SD Burman / Khali Haath Shaam Aayi Hai – RD Burman

Once again Pancham took inspiration from one of the Dada Burman’s earlier works, to come up with beautiful Khaali haath shaam aayi hai in Ijaazat(1987). The influence is primarily in the opening part as Pancham gave the composition a new look, color and mood.

 

3. Sujata Title Music – SD Burman / Aapke Kamre Me Koi Rehta Hai – RD Burman

An interesting and experimental makeover to what originally was a popular Rabindra Sangeet (Ore jhawr nemey aaye) which Dada Burman used in Sujata’s title music, and later Pancham reworked it to create the musical extravaganza as ‘Aapke Kamre me koi rehta hai‘ in Yaadon ki Baraat (1973). He has also used the tune to create a beautiful romantic number a few years earlier in a Bengali film Rajkumari (1970).

 

4. Hai ki jey kori – SD Burman / Tune O Rangeele – RD Burman

Pancham used the basic structure of the Mukhda and reworked the “Piya Piya” hook to come up with another melody in Kudrat (1983) for Tune o rangeele.

 

5. Katha kao dao saara – SD Burman / Ummeed Hogi Koi – RD Burman

Dada Burman’s version (which was not composed by him but Subol Dasgupta, as informed by Aniruddha Bhattacharjee) has minimalism in folk ambiance, while Pancham gives it a modern color for the brilliant non-film collaboration “Dil Padosi Hai” (1987). Both excel in their respective versions.  Two melancholic beauties derived from one composition.

 

6. Kuhu kuhu koyaliya – SD Burman / Kuhu kuhu bole koyaliya – RD Burman

Dada Burman sang this popular Nazrulgeeti in early part of his career. Pancham reworked it with Gulzar for the unreleased DevDas (1975). Dada Burman’s version carry the earthy/rustic feel of Jaggery, while Pancham version had the sweet flow of finished honey with the voice of Lata Mangeshkar.

 

7. Nitol paye rinik jhink – SD Burman / Jab bhi koi kangana – RD Burman

Dada Burman’s popular composition which also has traces of Rabindra Sangeet in the interlude was reused by Pancham in Shaukeen (1982).

 

 

8. Aami Soite pari – SD Burman / Kya bura hai kya bhala – RD Burman

A beautiful Karta composition again with minimal use of instrument just with the use of Sarangi & Tabla. Pancham  gave his version a modern qawwali treatment for unreleased Libaas. His second ever & last song with Lata in duets.

 

 

9. Madhu brindabone dole raadha – SD Burman / Meethe Bol bole – RD Burman

A semi classical gem by Dada Burman. Beta Burman reused it in Kinara (1977) with a lot of improvisation in treatment

 

10. Rongila rongila rongila re – SD Burman / Kuchh na kaho opening – RD Burman

The soul song of Dada Burman, a song which marked the beginning of Dada Burman’s musical journey, and Pancham used the core hook beautifully in his legendary comeback score of 1942 – A Love Story, as if he was given his last Tribute to his father & their collaboration.

 

And finally, here it is – Pancham’s confession on “Baap Ka Maal” -Hear from the Horse’s mouth.

 

 

 

Video  —  Posted: June 27, 2017 by sargamkesaathi in bollywood, cinema, music
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