Archive for August 25, 2010

The first trailer of Danny Boyle’s new film 127 Hours is out. Wondering why we are posting it here ? Two reasons. Well, if Vishwanathan Anand is not Indian, then Danny Boyle can be half-Indian. And it has music by A R Rahman. Check it out.

Wow! What energy. And the best part is that Boyle goes to other extreme after Slumdog Millionaire. From populist desi masala to a film revolving around just one character. The film is going to have its premiere at the Toronto International Film festival. And here is the official synopsis of the film….

127 HOURS is the true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston’s (James Franco) remarkable adventure to save himself after a fallen boulder crashes on his arm and traps him in an isolated canyon in Utah.

Over the next five days Ralston examines his life and survives the elements to finally discover he has the courage and the wherewithal to extricate himself by any means necessary, scale a 65 foot wall and hike over eight miles before he is finally rescued. Throughout his journey, Ralston recalls friends, lovers (Clemence Poesy), family, and the two hikers (Amber Tamblyn and Kate Mara) he met before his accident. Will they be the last two people he ever had the chance to meet?

A visceral thrilling story that will take an audience on a never before experienced journey and prove what we can do when we choose life.

And if it sounds interesting, do check the two videos where Aron Ralston talks about it….

Time to add one more to the list of desi films at Toronto International Film Festival ( TIFF) this year. And those who follow us on Twitter, they know that we have been shouting about it since quite sometime.

Actor Aamir Bashir turns director with Harud and its going to have its world premiere at the TIFF. Its selected in the Discovery section. The film has been shot by Shanker Raman and stars Reza Naji ( His breakthrough role was in Children of Heaven directed by the renowned filmmaker Majid Majidi. In 2008 he won the Silver Bear at the Berlin film festival for his performance in the film “Song of Sparrows), Shahnawaz Bhat, Shamim Basharat, Mudassir Khan, Salma Ashai.

And here is the official synopsis of the film..

Rafiq and his family are struggling to come to terms with the loss of his older brother Tauqir, a tourist photographer, who is one of the thousands of young men who have disappeared since the onset of the militant insurgency in Kashmir.

After an unsuccessful attempt to cross the border into Pakistan, to become a militant, Rafiq returns home to an aimless existence. Until one day he finds his brother’s old camera.

And to read what Cameron Bailey (Co-director of TIFF) thinks about it, click here or keep reading…..

The transition from actor to director was a smooth one for Aamir Bashir, whose debut feature Autumn offers a devastating glimpse into the wartorn wasteland of his native Kashmir, where survival is a daily challenge and dreams persist in the face of monumental loss. Bashir’s depiction of this region on India’s border with Pakistan – which has seen tens of thousands of deaths and disappearances since the 1989 outbreak of insurgency – is the meticulous and skilfully restrained work of someone well-acquainted with tragedy.

Rafiq (Shahnawaz Bhat) is a young man with an unsettling, silent bravery. After an unsuccessful attempt to cross the border into Pakistan, he rejoins his parents, who, like him, cannot recover from the disappearance of Rafiq’s older brother Tauqir. His father, Yusuf (Reza Naji), suffers debilitating paranoia, while his mother, Fatima (Shamim Basharat), gets by on hopeful delusion. Rafiq all but sleepwalks through the day, contending with ghostly images of his brother. A flicker of hope finally registers in Rafiq when he finds Tauqir’s old camera with a roll of undeveloped film. Photography (even the act of holding a camera) offers Rafiq a link to the past, a way to cope with the present and a source of hope for the future.

In Kashmir it is eternally autumn. Everything is on the cusp of destruction: parched leaves fall from trees, power lines spark ominously, while anger, fear and despair simmer beneath exhausted veneers. Death is everywhere. The film’s quiet, almost ethereal pacing is punctuated by jarring incidents. The oppressive surveillance of an overbearing military presence is echoed by Bashir’s widescreen framing of shots through door frames and windows; we too are implicated as voyeurs in this humiliating world where privacy does not exist. As tensions rise, Rafiq gravitates increasingly towards his camera, through which the boundaries between dream and reality, vision and hallucination, assume a fluid ambiguity.

Autumn is a remarkable achievement marked by indelible performances and a deeply personal understanding of the politics of family and war.

To know more about the film, click here to go to its official website.

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Pic Courtesy : Harud’s FB Group