Posts Tagged ‘Dharamshala International Film Festival’

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The Dharamshala International Film Festival is pleased to announce the DIFF Film Fellows Programme 2018. The Film Fellows initiative, which saw its inception in 2014, aims to encourage and develop filmmaking talent in the Indian Himalayan regions by offering mentorship opportunities with established filmmakers.

This year, the programme will focus specifically on filmmakers from Himachal Pradesh.

The programme will provide a much-needed opportunity to budding filmmakers from Himachal Pradesh who would otherwise have limited or no access to these resources. Five young filmmakers from the HP region will be selected and invited to attend DIFF, participate in its various events, and benefit from one-on-one mentorship sessions with established filmmakers.

Previous DIFF Film Fellows have come from across the Himalayan region, from Ladakh all the way to Arunachal Pradesh, and are now engaged in various stages of their filmmaking career.

Siddharth Chauhan, last year’s film fellow from Himachal Pradesh, and the director of Pashi (2017) says: “DIFF Film Fellows Programme was a break I desperately needed in my life and career. Surrounded by beautiful mountains, young people and the amazing two mentors (filmmakers Gurvinder Singh and Kesang Tseten) I got to learn and unlearn so many facets of filmmaking.”

The deadline for applying to this programme is 24 September 2018. Applicants must be between 18-45 years of age and hold bonafide Himachali certificates.

A jury made up of eminent filmmakers will review all applicants and the final selection of the five fellows will be announced by 1st October 2018.

Rules & Regulations
  1. The DIFF Film Fellows programme accepts applications from aspiring Film Directors.
  2. Applicants must be in the age group 18 to 45.
  3. Applicants must be from Himachal Pradesh.
  4. Applicants must submit a completed entry form together with a link to a short film they have directed.
  5. Films submitted must be shorter than 20 minutes in duration but may include excerpts from longer films. In the latter instance, please do not send the full film.
  6. Films can be submitted as a link on Vimeo, YouTube, etc.
  7. Non-English-language film must be subtitled in English.
  8. Films may be of any genre: fiction; documentary; experimental; animation; etc.
  9. A panel of industry professionals will judge the entries and their decision will be final.
  10. The application deadline is 24th September 2018.
  11. Successful applicants will be notified by 1st October 2018.

To apply for the fourth DIFF Film Fellows Programme, please download the application form below and send your completed application to info@diff.co.in and programmingassistant@diff.co.in by 24th September 2018.

Subject Line: DIFF Film Fellows Application.

DIFF FILM FELLOWS PROGRAMME ENTRY FORM

More details: DIFF Film Fellows

The 7th edition of Dharamshala International Film Festival, in association with the Paddy & Joan Leigh Fermor Arts Fund, announces the launch of the Dharamshala PJLF Editing Workshop 2018.

The Editing Workshop will be mentored by Internationally renowned editor Jacques Comets, editor and Artistic Director of the International Film Festival of Kerala Bina Paul, and Producer and Script & Editing Mentor Olivia Stewart.

Eligibility

The application for the workshop is only open to Director/Editor teams who are working closely together as equal collaborators on the edit of an Indian-language (including in English) feature film.

The film can be at any stage between rough-cut and fine cut and should be at least 90 minutes long. Indian-language films will need to have English subtitles.

Submission process

The following information must be submitted to: diffeditingworkshop@gmail.com

  1. Name of Director
  2. Address, email and mobile number of Director
  3. Short filmography of Director
  4. Name of Editor
  5. Address, email and mobile number of Editor
  6. Short filmography of Editor
  7. Short synopsis of film (max 200 words)
  8. Short statement outlining the reasons why Director and Editor want to enter their film for the Editing Workshop (max 200 words)
  9. Link to rough cut/fine cut with English subtitles

Submission deadline: 22 September 2018.
The decision of the Selection Committee will be final.
Two teams of director & editor will be given a chance to screen their film, receive feedback from a team of experienced film professionals and have two follow-up sessions working with the Editing Mentor on revising their cut and/or concentrating on particular sequences in their film.

Application Deadline & Dates

Applications are open from 23 August 2018 and the submission deadline is 22 September. The two selected projects will be announced on 8 October.

The two selected Director/Editor teams will be invited to come to Dharamshala for seven days from 29 October to 4 November. All their expenses including travel and stay will be covered by the workshop.

Editing Workshop Mentors: Bina Paul and Olivia Stewart
Editing Mentor: Jacques Comets
Selection Committee: Umesh Kulkarni, Bina Paul and Tenzing Sonam

Ritu Sarin + Tenzing Sonam

More details: http://diff.co.in/dharamshala-pjlf-editing-workshop-2018/

unnamedThe 5th Dharamshala International Film Festival (DIFF), which will be held from November 3 to 6th, 2016, at the Tibetan Children’s Village, Dharamshala, has announced its programme of films.

DIFF is curated by festival directors Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, along with associate director Raman Chawla, filmmaker Umesh Kulkarni (short films programme) and children’s media specialist Monica Wahi (children’s films programme).

– 15 filmmakers from across India and the world will present their work at DIFF 2016. Most of the films this year have been screened at prestigious international festivals and several are making their Indian premieres.

– Raam Reddy’s critically acclaimed Thithi will be the opening night film.

– Vetrimaran’s compelling Tamil drama Interrogation (India’s 2016 Oscar entry) will close the festival.

Feature documentaries:

  • Wojciech Staroń’s Brothers (Poland)
  • Steffi Giaracuni’s Didi Contractor: Marrying the Earth to the Building (Switzerland)
  • Laurie Anderson’s Heart of a Dog (France, USA)
  • Mickey Lemle’s The Last Dalai Lama? (USA)
  • Stanzin Dorjai Gya and Christiane Mordelet’s The Shepherdess of the Glaciers (France, India)
  • Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami’s Sonita (Germany, Switzerland, Iran)
  • Sean McAllister’s A Syrian Love Story (UK, France, Lebanon, Syria)
  • Pushpa Rawat’s The Turn (India)
  • Nguyễn Trinh Thi’s Vietnam the Movie (Vietnam)

 

Feature Narratives (International)

  • Pimpaka Towira’s The Island Funeral (Thailand)
  • Portmanteau film Ten Years (Hong Kong)
  • Jeon Soo-il’s A Korean in Paris (South Korea)
  • Wang Yichun’s What’s in the Darkness (China)
  • Boo Junfeng’s Apprentice (Singapore)
  • Evi Goldbrunner’s At Eye Level (Germany)              
  • Khyentse Norbu’s Hema Hema: Sing Me a Song While I Wait (Bhutan)         
  • Esen Isik’s Köpek (Switzerland)
  • Ara Chawdhury’s Miss Bulalacao (Phillipines)
  • Sebastian Schipper’s Victoria (Germany)    
  • Emir Baigazin’s The Wounded Angel (Kazakhstan)

 

Indian features

  • Raam Reddy’s Thithi
  • Vetrimaran’s Interrogation
  • Sanjeev Kumar’s Circles of the Mind
  • Mangesh Joshi’s Lathe Joshi
  • Rajiv Ravi’s Kammatipaadam
  • Umesh Kulkarni’s Highway
  • Bauddhyan Mukherji’s The Violin Player

 

Short films (International)

  • Tenzin Dasel and Rémi Caritey’s Royal Café (France)          
  • Kristóf Deák’s Sing (Hungary)         

 

Indian Short Films

  • Prabhjit Dhamija’s Asmad 
  • Hardik Mehta’s Famous in Ahmedabad
  • Pankaja Thakur’s The Guide
  • Chaitanya Tamhane’s Six Strands
  • Nishant Roy Bombarde’s The Threshold
  • Payal Sethi’s Leeches
  • Nina Sabnani’s We Make Images
  • Gurvinder Singh’s Infiltrator

–  Special local interest this year comes in the form of our Spotlight on Kangra Valley programme, which features Dharamshala director Sanjeev Kumar’s feature Man de Phere (Gaddi language);Prabhijit Dhamijia’s short Asmad and Steffi Giaracuni’s documentary about a legendary Himachal architect, Didi Contractor: Marrying the Earth to the Building.

– DIFF 2016 will also present a selection of single-channel video installations from Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary’s private collection: Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme’s Collapseand The Incidental Insurgents (Parts 1 and 2), and Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam’s Some Questions on the Nature of Your Existence.

– Further information on all of these films is available here.

– Online registration for DIFF 2016 is available through Book My Show here.

DIFF

Dharamshala International Film Festival (DIFF) 2016 invites submissions for the 3rd DIFF Film Fellows Programme – a Himalayan Filmmakers’ Lab that aims to develop filmmaking talent across India’s Himalayan regions.

– The residential programme features mentorship sessions, screenings of the best of contemporary independent cinema, masterclasses by visiting filmmakers and industry professionals, and panel discussions on contemporary filmmaking.

– This year, the mentorship sessions will focus on ‘The journey from idea to script in documentary filmmaking’, ‘Alternative forms of expression in documentaries’, ‘Producing a fiction short’, ‘Choices in constructing a narrative’, ‘Producing a short in anticipation of making a feature’.

Eligibility 

The DIFF Film Fellows Programme is open to aspiring directors from any of the following regions: Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarkhand, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Manipur, Mizoram, Tripura and the hill regions of West Bengal and Assam.

– DIFF is searching for film directors who are interested in polishing their skills and increasing the impact and reach of their work.

– Applicants must have made a least one film — a short or feature — and be aged between 18 and 30.

(Please refer to the DIFF Film Fellows Rules and Regulations for more detailed information)

How to Apply  

– Applicants should submit the duly completed Application Form (no application fee) with a film they have directed. A jury of three film professionals will review the applicants’ films, essays and notes on future projects, and select five DIFF fellows.

– Selected candidates must be able to attend all workshop sessions and participate in festival screenings and events.

– The application aorm is available on the website.

Application Deadline 

– Applications must be submitted by 16 August 2016. They may be sent by email to info@diff.co.in (please mention <DIFF Film Fellows 2016 – Application>, in the subject line).

– Successful candidates will be notified by 19 September 2016.

Where and When Mentorship sessions: 1–3 November 2016. Festival screenings and events: 3–6 November 2016. Venue House of Peace and Dialogue, Upper TCV, Dharamshala.

Fellowship Inclusions – The programme will cover train fares (two-tier AC) and food and lodging for the duration of the workshops and festival (1–6 November 2016).

– To know more about the DIFF Film Fellowship Program, please click here.

 

So after much hype (courtesy our friends Namrata JoshiAseem Chhabra and others), a few of us finally ended up joining them this time at the 3rd edition of the annual Dharamsala International Film Festival, up in the beautiful township of McLeodganj- and I’m happy to report that it did live up to the buzz, and I can’t wait to get up there again next year. It’s an excellently organized festival- with helpful signs all over town to guide you, autos hired to take you up to the main venue TIPA (Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts) and a wonderful, warm team of volunteers, some of who travel from various parts of India and the world to be part of this joyous little celebration of cinema up in the mountains, in a town without a single cinema theatre.

Clearly, the common thread among many of the films shown at DIFF was that they belonged to the genre I will call ‘cinema of social unrest’- and from what I hear, this was the case the year before as well. So there are many documentaries as well as fiction features about social and political movements, revolutions, human rights violation and conflicts of land, culture and identity. This feels especially apt considering Dharamshala itself is a place where you can distinctly feel the angst of displacement and the forced refugee status of Tibetans under the gentle, tranquil atmosphere of the town.

This year included a fairly interesting selection of films (you can check out the list here) as well as some interesting retrospectives, curated short film packages and masterclass/Q&A sessions with filmmakers such as Rajat Kapoor, Hansal Mehta, Gitanjali Rao, Q and Umesh Kulkarni. I’m afraid I did not manage to catch a whole lot of them- the main drawback of having a film festival in such a picturesque location is that you are conflicted whether to spend your time watching films or savor the sights around, not to mention visit all the charming cafés and eateries in the area. Still, here are a few notes on some of the films I did catch at the festival:

KILLA:

Killa

Avinash Arun’s debut feature is a gorgeously evocative and poignant film about friendship, loss and the resilient ability of children to deal with disappointment, displacement and even death. Killa is clearly a very personal film, and is shot and crafted with great love and sensitivity. It also features some unforgettable, textured characters brought to life with amazingly natural performances from Amruta Subhash, Archit Deodhar, Parth Bhalerao and a wonderful ensemble of young actors. This is yet another strong contemporary Marathi film about children, and definitely the one with most finesse out of the ones I’ve seen. I must mention here though that I haven’t seen Umesh Kulkarni’s acclaimed Vihir yet- interestingly, Avinash Arun cites Kulkarni as his mentor and a strong influence.

BRINGING TIBET HOME:

Bringing Tibet Home documents the deeply emotional and often funny story of New York-based artist Tenzing Rigdol’s audacious art project to reunite exiled Tibetans with their land, quite literally. After his father dies with his last wish of setting foot in his homeland unfulfilled, Tenzing decides that if Tibetans can’t return to Tibet, he will bring Tibet to them by smuggling 20 tonnes of native Tibetan soil to Dharamshala for a one-of-its-kind art installation. It was especially moving watching the film in Dharamshala- though it did also really make me ponder about what makes land itself so important to human beings. Maybe because I’ve never quite had roots anywhere, soil to me just feels a little overrated… ‘it’s just tiny little rocks.’

THE SQUARE:

This shattered my heart and blew my mind to bits. Jehane Noujaim’s The Square is the most devastating film I have seen in a long time and easily the best one I saw at Dharamshala. The film puts you right at the heart of a revolution inside Tahrir Square, with young, common people spiritedly fighting a fascist and fundamentalist regime in Egypt, spilling their blood and guts out for the hope of a brighter, free future even as they come to the crushing realization that courage and idealism aren’t enough to win their war against oppression. This is absolutely essential viewing- the auditorium was filled with tears and goosebumps in the end and the applause didn’t stop till the credits had finished rolling.

(PS: Also spotted in the documentary- Aida Elkashef from Ship of Theseus and a Vikramaditya Motwane doppelganger. I kid you not- the resemblance is uncanny. See if you can spot him. 😉 )

OMAR:

Director Hany Abu-Assad cleverly sets a gripping tale of love, deceit and betrayal against the Palestine-Israel conflict. The film borrows sparingly from Romeo and Juliet and Othello to give us a heady mix of socio-political thriller and Shakespearean drama- and while a comparison might be a little unfair- I can’t help feel that Omar blends the two a lot more seamlessly and effortlessly than Vishal Bhardwaj’s Haider, which of course is very good in its own right. Adam Bakri gives a superbly charismatic performance as the protagonist- though admittedly, it’s hard to take your eyes off him anyway considering how jaw-droppingly good he looks.

TRUE LOVE STORY:

Filmmaker Gitanjali Rao showcased a great set of Indian and international animated shorts curated by her at DIFF (including her marvelous Printed Rainbow), and ended the session with her newest film True Love Story, which screened at the Cannes Critics’ Week section earlier this year. The film, originally scripted to be part of a feature film (alas, no one wants to fund quality animation films in India) begins as a homage to masala movies which is both affectionate and hilariously tongue-in-cheek- but in the end reveals itself to be a sharp social satire, using a real-life tragedy that made headlines a few years back (the court case is still on) to brilliant, scathing effect. The film is a visual and aural delight with its colorful evocation of Bombay’s sights and sounds through Bollywood tinted glasses, and hopefully it will make its way to a wider audience soon. And I hope some producers funding ‘indie’ films (which more often than not, turn out to be sub-par) see the potential in this medium and back Ms Rao’s extraordinary talent and bring more of her singular, unique vision to the big screen.

Jahan Singh Bakshi

(Photos courtesy DIFF Facebook page, Mihir Pandya and author)

DIFF

The third edition of the Dharamshala International Film Festival begins on October 30th, 2014 with Rajat Kapoor’s acclaimed feature, Aankhon Dekhi. Rajat will also be present to introduce the film.

– The festival will also welcome several filmmakers along with Rajat Kapoor: Chaitanya Tamhane with his award-winning Court; Geetu Mohandas with Liar’s Dice, Q with Nabarun, Shabnam Sukhdev with her documentary, The Last Adieu; Pushpa Rawat with Nirnay; Tibetan filmmaker Tenzin Tsetan Choklay with Bringing Tibet Home; Finnish-Tibetan filmmakers Donagh Coleman and Lharigtso with A Gesar Bard’s Tale; and Swiss-Kurdish filmmaker Mano Khalil with The Beekeeper.

– Gitanjali Rao, one of India’s best-known animation filmmakers, will introduce her new film, True Love Story, and has also curated a series of animation films from India and internationally.

– Fest includes an Indian short film selection curated by reputed filmmaker Umesh Kulkarni.

– A highlight this year is the exciting package of films from the Middle East: Sundance and TIFF award-winning The Square by Jehane Noujaim; Return to Homs by Talal Derki which won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance; A World Not Ours by Mahdi Fleifel; and Hany Abu-Assad’s Cannes 2013 Jury Prize-winning Omar, which was also nominated for the Oscars.

– DIFF has also announced a series of Special Programmes that include an exploration of the world of sound, a visual journey through anonymous and powerful Tibetan voices, and a tribute to German artist and filmmaker, HarunFarocki, who passed away earlier this year.

a) Soundphiles is a celebration of listening. Curated by Samina Mishra and Iram Ghufran, the first edition – Many Echoes, Many Words –features filmmakers, artists, journalists and arts students who combine a diversity of worlds and forms of sound. The series draws the audience through the rhythm of the textile mills of Malegaon, broken sounds from the contested streets of London, a deafening bombing in Iran, scratchy magnetic tracks of old Hindi films and more.

b) In collaboration with the Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection, DIFF 2014 presents Unattributed, a video art series showcasing anonymous Tibetan artists living in Tibet and in the diaspora. The presentation explores the tension between an ancient culture’s unbroken artistic tradition and the personality-driven world of contemporary art.

c) In collaboration with the Goethe Institute, DIFF 2014 will present a retrospective of Harun Farocki’s films. Three films that capture the essence of his work will screen at the festival: Inextinguishable Fire (Farocki’s first movie after leaving film school); Videograms of a Revolution (in which he collects amateur video and material broadcast on television and chronicles the fall of a dictator in Romania); and Workers Leaving the Factory (an exploration of the factory worker through 100 years of film history).

– DIFF Film Fellows initiative; a programme was launched this year to nurture upcoming filmmaking talent in the Himalayan regions. The winners are Akee Sorokhaibam from Manipur, Khanjan Kishore Nath from Assam, Kombong Darang from Arunachal Pradesh, Munmun Dhalaria from Himachal Pradesh and Smanla Dorje Nurboo from Ladakh. The five DIFF Film Fellows were selected from 28 applicants through a rigorous process by a jury of eminent film personalities – Hansal Mehta, Anupama Srinivasan and Bina Paul.

The five winners will have the opportunity to be a part of DIFF 2014 and to engage in special mentorship sessions with the jury and attending filmmakers.  They come from varied backgrounds, brought together by a shared passion for filmmaking.

– The 3rd edition of the Dharamshala International Film Festival will take place in McLeod Ganj, Upper Dharamshala, between 30 October and 2 November. Longtime residents of Dharamshala, Indian-Tibetan filmmaking couple Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, initiated the film festival with the aim to bring high quality independent cinema to Dharamshala, encourage local filmmaking talent and create a meaningful platform for engage all the communities in the area.

– For more : DIFF House, Opposite Norbulingka Institute, PO : Sidhpur, Distt : Kangra, HP 176057

– Email : info@diff.co.in | www.diff.co.in

– FB page is here

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