Archive for the ‘Film Festival’ Category

Aanand L. Rai, Sohum Shah, and Anand Gandhi’s much awaited mythological thriller about a goddess who created the entire universe, Tumbbad opened the Venice Film Festival’s Critics’ Week and is generating a lot of buzz at Venice Film Festival.

So here’s all the buzz around the film at the fest.

– Baradwaj Rangan’s review on Film Companion here

– Hollywood Reporter’s review here

– Screen Daily’s review here

– Sohum Shah’s interview in Variety here

– Sohum Shah on the film in Quint here

– Jared Mobarak’s review on The Film Stage here

– Deloret Imnidia’s review on High on Films here

– Tommaso Tocci’s review on Ion Cinema here

– Bénédicte Prot’s review on on Cineuropa here

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The Dharamshala International Film Festival is pleased to announce the DIFF Film Fellows Programme 2018. The Film Fellows initiative, which saw its inception in 2014, aims to encourage and develop filmmaking talent in the Indian Himalayan regions by offering mentorship opportunities with established filmmakers.

This year, the programme will focus specifically on filmmakers from Himachal Pradesh.

The programme will provide a much-needed opportunity to budding filmmakers from Himachal Pradesh who would otherwise have limited or no access to these resources. Five young filmmakers from the HP region will be selected and invited to attend DIFF, participate in its various events, and benefit from one-on-one mentorship sessions with established filmmakers.

Previous DIFF Film Fellows have come from across the Himalayan region, from Ladakh all the way to Arunachal Pradesh, and are now engaged in various stages of their filmmaking career.

Siddharth Chauhan, last year’s film fellow from Himachal Pradesh, and the director of Pashi (2017) says: “DIFF Film Fellows Programme was a break I desperately needed in my life and career. Surrounded by beautiful mountains, young people and the amazing two mentors (filmmakers Gurvinder Singh and Kesang Tseten) I got to learn and unlearn so many facets of filmmaking.”

The deadline for applying to this programme is 24 September 2018. Applicants must be between 18-45 years of age and hold bonafide Himachali certificates.

A jury made up of eminent filmmakers will review all applicants and the final selection of the five fellows will be announced by 1st October 2018.

Rules & Regulations
  1. The DIFF Film Fellows programme accepts applications from aspiring Film Directors.
  2. Applicants must be in the age group 18 to 45.
  3. Applicants must be from Himachal Pradesh.
  4. Applicants must submit a completed entry form together with a link to a short film they have directed.
  5. Films submitted must be shorter than 20 minutes in duration but may include excerpts from longer films. In the latter instance, please do not send the full film.
  6. Films can be submitted as a link on Vimeo, YouTube, etc.
  7. Non-English-language film must be subtitled in English.
  8. Films may be of any genre: fiction; documentary; experimental; animation; etc.
  9. A panel of industry professionals will judge the entries and their decision will be final.
  10. The application deadline is 24th September 2018.
  11. Successful applicants will be notified by 1st October 2018.

To apply for the fourth DIFF Film Fellows Programme, please download the application form below and send your completed application to info@diff.co.in and programmingassistant@diff.co.in by 24th September 2018.

Subject Line: DIFF Film Fellows Application.

DIFF FILM FELLOWS PROGRAMME ENTRY FORM

More details: DIFF Film Fellows

The National Film Development Corporation has announced the Call for Entries for the 12th Year of Film Bazaar Co-Production Market.

Full length fiction feature projects with South Asian themes are invited to apply.

The Deadline for submissions is September 13th, 2018. Extended Deadline is September 18th 2018. The deadline has been extended to September 30th 2018.

The Market will be held between 20-24th November, 2018 at Film Bazaar, Goa.

The Co-Production Market presents a list of curated projects to the national and international film professionals attending Film Bazaar. The Market kicks off with Open Pitch where participants present their projects through Video Pitches to an audience of investors, producers and financiers. The four days of the market are earmarked for one on one meetings specially scheduled for each project.

Over the years, the dedicated team has honed its skills for matching projects with the right delegates. Dedicated online and print catalogues consisting of all project details are available for Film Bazaar attendees interested in Co Production Market projects. The Co-Production Market also conducts an orientation session to familiarize participants to Open Pitch as well as the working of the Co-Production Market and Film Bazaar.

For Application Form and more details, please visit https://filmbazaarindia.com/co-production-market/
For further queries, write to: coproduction@filmbazaarindia.com

CPM Projects Over the Years:

  • Lipstick Under My Burkha, Alankrita Shrivastava CPM 2013
  • Newton, Amit Masurkar, CPM 2015
  • Song of the Scorpions, Anup Singh CPM 2013
  • Beyond the Known World, Pan Nalin, CPM 2012
  • Lady of the Lake, Haobam Paban Kumar, CPM 2011
  • Manto, Nandita Das (in production), CPM 2015
  • Court, Chaitanya Tamhane, CPM 2012 (VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 2014)
  • Chauthi Koot, Gurvinder Singer, CPM 2012 (FESTIVAL DE CANNES 2015)
  • Titli, Kanu Behl CPM 2012 (FESTIVAL DE CANNES 2014)
  • Liar’s Dice, Geetu Mohan Das, CPM 2011 (Official Selection, Sundance Film Festival, IFFRIndia’s Official Entry to the 87th Academy Awards)
  • Arunoday, Partho Sengupta, CPM 2012 (BUSAN 2014)
  • Highway, Umesh Kulkarni CPM 2013
  • Television, Mostofa Farooki CPM 2010 (PUSAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2012) Chauranga, Bikas Mishra, CPM 2011 (MUMBAI FILM FESTIVAL 2014)
  • Qissa, Anup Singh CPM 2008 (Toronto International Film Festival 2013)
  • LSD, Dibakar Banerjee (CPM 2009) (Filmfare for Best Editing, Sound Design, Stardust Film of the Year)
  • Paltadacho Munis, Laxmikant Shetgaonkar (TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, FIPRESCI for Discovery 2009)
  • That girl with Yellow Boots, Anurag Kashyap (VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2010)
  • Deool, Umesh Vinayak Kulkarni (BUSAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2011 & 59th National Award for Best Feature Film).
  • Karma, Prasanna Jayakody (ROTTERDAM INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2011)
  • Shanghai, Dibakar Banerjee (TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2012)
  • Miss Lovely, Ashim Ahluwalia (FESTIVAL DE CANNES 2012)
  • Mumbai Cha Raja, Manjeet Singh (TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2012)
  • As the River Flows, Bidyut Kotoky, CPM 2007
  • Shor in the City, Krish D K, Raj Nidimoru, (CPM 2007) (MIAAC Festival – Best Director, PUSAN FIlm Festival, Dubai International Film Festival 2010)
  • 28, Prasanna Jayakody, CPM 2013, (IFFR, 2014 – NETPAC Award.)

Some of the projects and people who have attended the Co Production Market at Film Bazaar are Chedomir Kolar [ Producer No Man’s Land], Mustofa Sarwar Farooki [Director Television], Michael Werner [Fortissimo Films ], Chris Paton [San Sebastian Film Festival], Christian Jeune [Cannes Film Festival], Kristen Niehuus [Medien Board, Berlin-Brandenburg] Remi Burah [Arte France Cinema], Anurag Kashyap, Madhu Mantena, Manish Mundhra, Sooni Taraporewala, Sabiha Sumar [Director Khamosh Pani], Guneet Monga, Nandita Das, Govind Nihalani, Shyam Benegal, Pablo Bertolini [Venice Film Festival], Charles Tesson [Cemaine de la Crtique Cannes Film Festival], Aviva Silver [NEA cinema, Belgium], Anup Singh [Director Quissa],Catherine Dussart [Producer Chautih Koot France], Ramesh Sippy, Kabir Khan, Sheeladitya Bora, Marco Muller, [Beijing Film Festival], Benjamin Illos [Director’s Fortnight, Cannes]

Ivan Ayr’s debut film Soni, which is making its world premiere at the 75th Venice Film Festival under the Orizzonti Competition category just released its first look poster and trailer.

It is the only Indian feature to compete at the festival.

Summary of the film

Soni, a young policewoman in Delhi, and her superintendent, Kalpana, have collectively taken on a growing crisis of violent crimes against women. However, their alliance suffers a major setback when Soni is transferred out for alleged misconduct on duty.

Soni had won the Facebook Award for Best ‘Work-In-Progress’ Project and Prasad DI Award for the Best Film In ‘Film Bazaar Recommends’ section at NFDC Film Bazaar 2017.

The film has a running time of 97 minutes and features newcomers Geetika Vidya Ohlyan and Saloni Batra in lead roles. The producers are Kimsi Singh and Kartikeya Narayan Singh, whose previous credits include the 2015 Cannes Un Certain Regard Selection Chauthi Koot.

The 7th edition of Dharamshala International Film Festival, in association with the Paddy & Joan Leigh Fermor Arts Fund, announces the launch of the Dharamshala PJLF Editing Workshop 2018.

The Editing Workshop will be mentored by Internationally renowned editor Jacques Comets, editor and Artistic Director of the International Film Festival of Kerala Bina Paul, and Producer and Script & Editing Mentor Olivia Stewart.

Eligibility

The application for the workshop is only open to Director/Editor teams who are working closely together as equal collaborators on the edit of an Indian-language (including in English) feature film.

The film can be at any stage between rough-cut and fine cut and should be at least 90 minutes long. Indian-language films will need to have English subtitles.

Submission process

The following information must be submitted to: diffeditingworkshop@gmail.com

  1. Name of Director
  2. Address, email and mobile number of Director
  3. Short filmography of Director
  4. Name of Editor
  5. Address, email and mobile number of Editor
  6. Short filmography of Editor
  7. Short synopsis of film (max 200 words)
  8. Short statement outlining the reasons why Director and Editor want to enter their film for the Editing Workshop (max 200 words)
  9. Link to rough cut/fine cut with English subtitles

Submission deadline: 22 September 2018.
The decision of the Selection Committee will be final.
Two teams of director & editor will be given a chance to screen their film, receive feedback from a team of experienced film professionals and have two follow-up sessions working with the Editing Mentor on revising their cut and/or concentrating on particular sequences in their film.

Application Deadline & Dates

Applications are open from 23 August 2018 and the submission deadline is 22 September. The two selected projects will be announced on 8 October.

The two selected Director/Editor teams will be invited to come to Dharamshala for seven days from 29 October to 4 November. All their expenses including travel and stay will be covered by the workshop.

Editing Workshop Mentors: Bina Paul and Olivia Stewart
Editing Mentor: Jacques Comets
Selection Committee: Umesh Kulkarni, Bina Paul and Tenzing Sonam

Ritu Sarin + Tenzing Sonam

More details: http://diff.co.in/dharamshala-pjlf-editing-workshop-2018/

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Renowned Indian documentary maker Anand Patwardhan’s latest film Reason (Vivek) is having its world premiere at TIFF in the TIFF Docs section.

The official note from the festival reads:

In what is perhaps his most urgent and thorough exploration of Indian society yet, renowned documentarian Anand Patwardhan charts his country’s slide away from secular democracy and toward divisions of power, caste, and religious belief — and the violence that has followed.

Anand Patwardhan’s passionate, detailed chronicling of injustices in India has made him the filmmaking conscience of his nation. In The Name of God, Jai Bhim Comrade, and Father, Son, and Holy War stand not only as first-rate documentaries, but as direct interventions on behalf of justice and compassion. After years of work, Patwardhan is back with perhaps his most urgent and thorough film yet.

Divided into eight chapters, Reason sets out to chart what Patwardhan sees as India’s slide away from the complex tumult of a secular democracy towards hardening divisions of power, caste, and religious belief — lines that are enforced increasingly by violence.

The first chapters recount the work, struggles, and eventual assassinations of Narendra Dabholkar, a rationalist who fought what he called “blind faith,” and Govind Pansare, a communist politician and anti-caste activist. Later chapters probe subjects such as Dalit caste protests against social oppression, terrorism’s tangled roots, and how religious outrage can so easily descend into mob violence. Accompanying interviews, captured footage, and archive sequences, Patwardhan’s voiceover makes connections and provides deeper context.

Reason is not an easy film to watch, nor should it be. The film denounces — and depicts — violence perpetrated or fuelled by religious nationalists pushing to make India a Hindu state. As Reason builds and expands toward its conclusion, the scale of the dangers India faces becomes clear, and connections are made between the country’s inner conflicts and the similar political fires burning all over the world. Even with countless people of conscience offering resistance, the film ends with yet one more assassination. This time it is a journalist.

The film runs at 260 minutes, is shot by Anand Patwardhan himself along with Simantini Dhuru, and edited by Patwardhan.

Anand Patwardhan is one of the most prolific documentary makers from India, with films like In the Name of God (’92) and Father, Son and Holy War (’94), both of which have featured at TIFF in the past, as well as War and Peace (02) and Jai Bhim Comrade (11).

The first look of Vasan Bala’s upcoming Bollywood-infused action film Mard Ko Dard Nahi Hota (MKDNH) is out. It’s teaser cut for the Toronto International Film Festival. Take a look.

MKDNH is the first ever Indian film to be a part of TIFF 18’s Midnight Madness. It stars Bhagyashree’s son Abhimanyu Dasani and TV star Radhika Madan who is also playing a lead in Vishal Bhardwaj’s next. The film is produced by RSVP.

NFDC Film Bazaar 2018 is calling for entries for the Viewing Room and the Work-in-Progress (WIP) Lab.

– Film Bazaar will be held from November 20-24, 2018 at the Goa Marriott Resort.

– The Early Bird Deadline for submissions is August 31, 2018, which will offer a discount on the submission fees. The last date for submission of completed applications is September 14th 2018.

WIP Lab

– Submissions are invited for the WIP Fiction lab.

– Up to five projects in their rough-cut stage will be selected to be presented to a panel of international film experts for their feedback.

– Feature-length fiction films of any genre in the rough-cut stage are invited to apply to the WIP lab.

Viewing Room

The Viewing Room will present films seeking finishing funds, world sales, distribution partners and film festivals to investors, world sales agents and film festival programmers attending the film bazaar. Here, films are viewed on individual computer terminals in private booths via a specially designed software which allows the users to contact the director or producer of the film via email.

– Films (fiction/documentary) of all genres and lengths in rough or final cut are invited to apply to the Viewing Room.

– Feature length films in the rough cut are eligible to apply to both WIP lab and Viewing Room.

– Short films can also be submitted to the Viewing Room, which will be showcased in a category called Short Films.

– For application form and other details, click here.

The films that were a part of the previous Work-in-Progress Labs at Film Bazaar have had their world premieres at leading international film festivals and some have even gone on to enjoy a successful theatrical run. These include Raam Reddy’s Thithi, Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari’s Nil Battey Sannata, Kanu Behl’s Titli, Avinash Arun’s Killa, Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely, Anand Gandhi’s Ship of Theseus, Ajay Bahl’s BA Pass, Ere Gowda’s Balekampa, Alankrita Shrivastava’s Lipstick Under My Burkha, Dipesh Jain’s Gali Guleiyan.

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Vasan Bala’s new film Mard Ko Dard Nahi Hota (The Man Who Feels No Pain) is going to be featured at the Toronto International Film Festival’s (TIFF) ‘Midnight Madness’ section. It’s the first Indian movie to be featured in Midnight Madness.

Here’s the official TIFF program note on the film:

In this Bollywood-infused action film from Vasan Bala (Peddlers), a young man quite literally born with the ability to feel no pain strikes out on a quest to vanquish 100 foes.

Cast: Abhimanyu Dasani, Radhika Madan, Gulshan Devaiah and Mahesh Manjrekar
Abhimanyu is the son of ‘Maine Pyar Kiya’ actress Bhagyashree, while Radhika Madan is a popular television star who is also playing one of the main characters in Vishal Bharadwaj’s next ‘Patakha’.

The 131 min film is produced by Ronnie Screwvala’s RSVP.

LOVELESS

We as an urban global world have slowly found arrogant comfort and convenience in being lonely and loveless. I am certain that when the world will be dying, we will be busy waiting for a youtube video to buffer.

These were my first thoughts after coming out of the cold, edge of the seat, apocalyptic, eerie, and devastating piece called Loveless by Andrei Zvyagintsev (Leaviathan and The Return). This is a burning symphony on the spiritual disaster of a failed marriage as Andrei uses lifeless streetlights, streets, cold Tarkosky forests, and empty abandoned buildings to document the remains of a ruined marriage. Unlike most of the movies I have seen, the first time we see a couple arguing over who does not want to keep the child over the usual debate of who would love to take the custody. The couple going through the failed marriage along with modern Russia seem busy in loveless intimate acts, selfies, luxurious apartments, status, money, freedom and, sleep while their child goes missing from their house. As Nietzsche quotes, “They do not want to know the truth because the truth would break their illusions” The couple are forced to run around abandoned buildings, hospital beds, make phone-calls, reach out to neighbors, and deal with bureaucratic cops – and they do so with the zeal and enthusiasm of a dead octopus.

In one of the most heart-wrenching sequences of the film, the police, search party, and the father of the lost child are seen searching an eerily- in-ruin abandoned building in the middle of the forest which used to be the missing kid’s spot. The shots of this building by Andrei’s regular cinematographer Mikhail Krichman are metaphorical of the loveless state a disastrous marriage can take. Cannes Jury Prize winner Loveless is an essential film to watch. The film will has morose impacts on your mood – as Marcel Proust would put it “Happiness is beneficial for the body, but it is the grief that develops the powers of the mind.”

ASHWATTHAMA

We all have grown up listening to the stories about the warrior Ashwatthama still being alive, though, not as a result of being immortal but rather as curse given to him by Krishna. According to legend, Krishna was angry with Ashwatthama for killing Pandava’s sons. He decided to curse Ashwatthama to avenge the destruction of Pandava’s lineage – hence cursing him with an unending life of pain and suffering. Krishna cursed Ashwatthama with terrible leprosy that would haunt him for 3,000 years. Krishna further stated that Ashwatthama would not be helped by anyone or provided food or shelter.

Now imagine a young 9 year old Ishwaku, who is growing up on this story, and suddenly is burdened with equal pain as Aswatthama is in the legend. Francois Truffaut meets Satyajit Ray in Pushpendra Singh’s Ashwatthama – a surprise gem in the India Gold section of Mumbai Film Festival this year. Pushpendra Singh inter-cuts between the painful reality of the kid’s existence after the loss of his mother with folk songs, cultural narrative of Rajasthan and Madya Pradesh, Ishwaku’s dreams, imaginations, and search for Ashwatthama who is supposed to be living in abandoned ruins of the village. The myths, religion, and customs of the village shape devastating childhoods for the kids living here. The plight is shown with rich impact through an almost black and white lifeless atmosphere. Pushpendra Singh looks completely in control of this film as every shot of the film is rich and haunting aided by cinematographer Ravi Kiran Ayyagiri. A few rare moments of imagination of the kid explode with color on screen, bursting into the suppressed desires flowing with the mind of Ishwaku.

Although, the influence of the likes of Truffaut, Kiarostami, and Ray are evident; the film still is one of the most authentic, pure, rustic, and, genuine coming of age movies I have ever seen. The film is filled with melancholic nostalgia – especially if you have spent your childhood days loitering around in vast landscapes and nights spent imagining the stories from your family storytellers.

ZOO

“Death is not the greatest loss. Loss is what dies when you’re still alive”, said Tupac. Tupac and Notorious B.I.G.’s sour turned friendship is a severely heartbreaking tale for upcoming rappers. This tale has its fair share of influence on the underbelly of Mumbai slums.

Aspiring rappers from these slums, Prince Daniel and Yogesh Kurme are dreaming to become an epic rap duo like Tupac and Notorious B.I.G. However, Prince is also certain to not let their friendship turn sour like it happens in the former story. Little did they know that the landscape they are trying to survive in is filled with drugs. Messi played by Rahul Kumar (Millimeter from 3 Idiots) aspires to take over his elder brother’s drug empire inspite of having a potential career in football. Messi’s brother played by Shashank Arora is a drug seller who supplies ‘sugar’ to a city running deep on these white lines. This also includes Shweta Tripathi’s character who has not stepped out of house since months owing to a past incident. Her life is filled with PS4, online food deliveries, coffee, and delivery of sugar. The lives of all these characters somewhere or the other end up with drugs taking away the best of them.

However, in the process of showing this degradation due to drugs, Shlok Sharma gives us some really fresh scenes like Shashank’s character playing a dumb waiter at a coffee shop, Prince and Yogesh singing probably the most hilariously obscene rap lyrics ever witnessed in an Indian film, or Messi doing a Robert De Niro like mirror scene. The rotting drug filled contemporary Mumbai underbelly has been captured with complete accuracy by Shlok Sharma in this film completely shot on an Iphone. The narrative of Zoo fills much more complete than it did in Vasan Bala’s Peddlers. Having disliked Haramkhor, Shlok Sharma’s Zoo was a pleasant surprise for me.

MACHINES

Rahul Jain’s Machines aims to empathise us with the sub humane working conditions in textile factories of Gujarat, India. It raises the same old questions of wages, standard of living and, the work life balance which is absolutely missing in the lives of the workers documented. However, Machines is shot in a meditative fashion, allowing some of the shots of the Machines to make you really wonder who the slaves are – Machines or Men themselves?

The cinematography of the film is breathing with sweat, chemicals, dirt, and life in these factories. These breathing shots allow you to experience life in these windowless rooms. Men bathe, eat, work, and live around chemicals as if they are living out of a suitcase in Tokyo. In one of the most subtle yet painful shots, a man is seen entertaining himself by resting his feet on a machine which is in full throttle action, the vibrations of the machine are music to his tired musceles which are being massaged in the process.

Rahul Jain succeeds in creating an immersion point for the viewers through sight, sound, and smell through shots of the nightmarishly sludgy company rolled around in profits while their workers survive on peanuts. The 70 minute film is a visual treat which raises no new questions but still immerses is in the textile toil of carried by the workers. The final scene of this movie is a stunning blow where a group of workers surround the camera and start asking the intentions of the film being made. The sound design on the film is commendable as a musical treatment comes together through the various noises of the factory creating an invigorating track of sorts which leaves you thinking.

NOTHINGWOOD

“ No Hollywood, No Bollywood, We are Nothingwood; we have no money and no resources. Qayamat is here (end of the world) but my Ishq-e-cinema (love for cinema) is forever. “

Father of 14 kids in the worn torn Afghanistan; Salim Shaheen is the prince of Afghanistan’s film industry where cinema itself has been banned by the Taliban. Sonia Kronlund documents the extravagant and tour de force director Salim Shaheen while he is shooting his 111th movie which is an autobiographical affair on his own transition from being and Army General to being the Badshah of Afghan Cinema. Salim Shaheen and his crew’s energy is as infectious as a film crew finishing their student project. The passion of Salim Shaheen for films over bullets reeks out of all the statements, songs, visuals, which are beautiful woven together in this documentary.

In one of the most job dropping yet hilarious scenes, a chicken is sacrificed on the sets of the film to showcase spilled blood in his new film. This scene is a testimony to the love and passion for cinema which is harboured by Salim and his team. With almost no resources and funds, Salim has been making films since decades. A huge fan of Bollywood actors Dharmendra and Manoj Kumar, Salim started by making lip sync videos by singing to the famous Indian songs. Today, his movies are seen by people across the sides of Taliban and Police.

This film is an ode to film makers, a love letter for people who are so wildly passionate for cinema that they can do nothing else with their lives. A retired army general turned filmmaker Salim shows us that passion is all you need for making a movie, rest is and always will be upto the destiny. This film will leave you cheering in the end for Salim’s relentlessl and infectious energy.

– Harsh Desai
(Tweets: @iamharshdesai
Senior Partner, Lowfundwala Productions http://www.lowfundwala.com)