Posts Tagged ‘National Awards’

There is a nice little picture of Roger Ebert (or Ebert saab, as we call him) which keeps getting featured. He is looking into the camera with his head turned, smiling, holding the Sun-Times newspaper in his hand. It has the headline, Our Ebert Won Pultizer. It’s one of those images that stays with your for eternity. That “Our” in the headline puts such a strong sense of pride and belonging. If you haven’t seen the image, click here. And that’s the inspiration for our header too.

Masaan has been doing the festival rounds since its premiere at Cannes. And it has also been bagging a lot of awards, again starting from Cannes. But National Awards has its own charm and it feels like a perfect homecoming. Neeraj Ghaywan won the Swarna Kamal for Best Debut Film Of A Director. And Varun Grover won the award for Best Lyrics, for Dum Laga Ke Haisha’s Moh moh ke dhaage. Here are some pics from the D-day.

(click on any pic to enlarge and  start the slide show)

UPDATE – Here’s some more update from our Masaan boys. Both Neeraj Ghaywan and Varun Grover have decided to donate their cash prize towards relief work for farmers. All in their tweets.

 

61st National Awards for 2013 – Complete List is here

Posted: April 16, 2014 by moifightclub in Awards
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The 61st National Film awards were announced today. Among the major winners are – Anand Gandhi’s Ship of Theseus as Best Feature Film, Hansal Mehta for Best Director (Shahid),  Rajkummar Rao for Best Actor (Shahid) which he shares with Suraj Venjaramoodu for Malayalam-film Perariyathavar. Geetanjali Thapa got Best Actress for Liar’s Dice and Rajeev Ravi for its cinematography. Sourabh Shukla bagged it for Best Supporting Actor (Jolly LLB), Amruta Subhash (Astu – Marathi) and Aida El-Kashif (Ship of Theseus) got it for Best Supporting Actress.

Fandry won the award for Best Debut Film of a Director (Nagraj Manjule). Award for Best Production Design went to Ashim Ahluwalia, Tabsheer Zutshi and Parichit Paralkar for Miss Lovely. The film also won the Special Jury award. Best Children’s Film Award was announced for Batul Mukhtiyar’s Kaphal.

In the non-feature category, Kamal Swaroop’s Rangbhoomi won the Best Film. Shubhashish Bhutiani’s Kush won the award for Best Promotional film. Nishtha Jain’s Gulabi Gang won the awards for Best Film on Social Issues and for Best Editing. Best Investigative Film went to Deepti Kakkar and Fahad Mustafa’s Powerless.

For Fiction films,  the 11-member jury was headed by noted directed Saeed Akhtar Mirza.

Here’s the complete list of winners

ApprovedCelluloudMan

Pain is temporary, film is forever” – Michael J. Fox

Unfortunately, it is not. And neither are memories, both die, if not carefully preserved. Without memories, the past is a blank slate, existing in a space where we cannot touch it. Without a past we are a blank slate, forever trapped in a present that makes little sense. Films, like all our art, keeps our past safe, for us to delve into and understand how we came this far and, more importantly, where to go from here.

P.K. Nair understood this and scraped together our largely dissipated past, bit by bit, literally from across the country’s landscape and even beyond. What I felt when I heard that was sheer awe. And awe-inspiring is everything about Shivendra Singh Dungarpur’s documentary, “Celluloid Man”.

The film is the centre of attention right now, thanks to a much-deserved release (a shout out to the rare PVR Rare!), the National Awards, the Cannes selection and especially the centenary of our much-maligned yet much-beloved Hindi Film Industry. Much has been written about it so I’d like to simply share what the film did to me instead.

I like watching documentaries in the theatre. Especially our Indian docus which, by default, generally have a rusty appeal that somehow get an exotic aura in the hall. I also like everything old and forgotten; its romance and nostalgia, and the bitter-sweet pain that memories always bring with them. Celluloid Man, smelling of museums and ruins, was tailor-made for me. I walked in with the same excitement, same anticipation I had while watching Hugo, except that this was a bit more personal. This was about history that was specifically ‘mine’.

I settled down and there was this old, decrepit man detailing first-hand, his journey of collecting films and teaching a stubborn India the importance of preserving its history. How he salvaged the print of Dadasaheb Phalke’s ‘Kaliya Mardan’ and put the film together with little besides Phalke’s small notebook and his own diligence. How he travelled to remote corners of the country to collect film negatives, even bits. How Ardeshir Irani’s son confessed to having sold his father’s negatives for silver extraction. How he made prints of films that came to FTII for screening without bothering about permission. How he bargained and bartered copies of Indian films for foreign ones. His meeting with Langlois of Paris’ Cinematheque (I particularly loved how unimpressed he was about the meeting with what seemed-like a rather stuffy Langlois purely from the way Nair saab relates the meeting). And how much he now misses being close to what was probably the only love of his life, films.

But that was not all. The legendary man has a legendary memory of the location of every scene in every film he has archived. The NFAI under him collected 12,000 films, 8000 Indian and 4000 foreign. The mind boggles, yes. But that is not all, as he walked around FTII he also recollected memories of the old Prabhat Studios effortlessly. Of a certain make-up room at the then Prabhat Studios and now FTII campus that was Madhubala’s favourite. Of a certain wooden floor having a tank underneath to convert it for outdoor water sequences. Of the sturdy equipment still in use. Of Prabhat Studios being modelled on the best of Hollywood indoor studios. His memory and appetite for trivia seemed as marvellous as his legacy.

Even more marvellous was to watch the number of lives he touched. Lives of the very people who have created our celluloid history. It was immensely humbling to watch each one of them speak ever-so-warmly about their association with him. Of Girish Kasavaralli recalling how his thoroughly neglected Ghattashraddha was restored and archived. Of Jahnua Barua talking of how Nair saab helped him out by giving him a much-need job which he suspects was an unofficial arrangement. Of an aged Jaya Bachchan recalling with the pride of a young student how she was the only girl allowed for night screenings because Nair saab vouched for her dedication. Of Naseeruddin Shah gleefully talking of surreptitious screenings of censored cuts. Of Vidhu Vinod Chopra’s awe at being handed the print of Godard’s Breathless to study for as long as he wished. He came across as this strict Guru, dedicated to authentic instruction and learning, willing to go to any lengths to open up a student’s horizons if he sensed the hunger. And of Gulzar saab warmly (rightly) placing him next to Dadasaheb Phalke in importance to our film history.

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The film packed in bytes with so many important film personalities, right from Sitara Devi, that it felt like some sort of a masterclass in itself. Maybe it is to accommodate their presence then, it has a loose structure. It pans out as a long-winded stroll down memory lane piecing together the painstaking effort of Nair saab’s work with the sole purpose of celebrating the man and his achievements through his and other’s eyes. I didn’t mind the rather meandering and sometimes repetitive narrative solely because this is one film that proves Roger Ebert wrong. The ‘what’ matters more than the ‘how’. Besides, where do you ever get to listen to the likes of Adoor Gopalkrishnan, Kumar Shahani, Gulzar saab, Saeed Mirza and Shyam Benegal at length, at one place?

The film is an unabashed ode, yet, Shivendra Singh Dungarpur takes care to include controversies surrounding the exclusion of Nair saab post his retirement. Neither does he shy away from asking him a tough question, framing his habit of making copies without permission as ‘stealing’. And keeping the camera rolling through an uncomfortable silence and a louder repetition of the question. It could have been edited out but it wasn’t.

He also goes beyond the purview of Nair saab’s work, into his personal life to give us a better glimpse of the man. Unacknowledged, but I was dreading this part. When have men with a singular passion ever had happy personal lives? What followed were long and touchingly forthcoming interviews with Beena Nair, his daughter who confessed how father was never available during her and her brother’s childhood. But now things had changed as she had accepted that it wasn’t lack of love for them but too much love for films that kept him away. I didn’t want to look at her face closely or read her emotions because it seemed like a preciously personal part of her past she was sharing, who am I to peek into someone’s pain? It touched a raw nerve nevertheless. Having an emotionally unavailable parent isn’t easy, I have one. Besides, there is this incident from childhood sharply imprinted on my memory that it sruck. My father is a huge fan of the Gujarati shayar/poet Mareez. He quotes him off-handedly at any point with a look of pure bliss. Once, he had the opportunity to meet him, that too at his home. My gushing dad asked Mareez to recite a few lines for him and Mareez saab obliged. After the recital, his daughter came forward and thanked my father and said something like, ‘Thanks to you we heard father’s poetry today. He never shares anything with us, ever. He is in his own world, it’s like we don’t exist.’ As a child I understood the girl, as an older person with a few insistent passions of her own, I understand Mareez and Nair saab too today. Passion does that. Separates you from everything. You are alone in it, because there you are already with that one thing you love, you don’t need anyone else.

In more than two hours, what I saw unfold onscreen was a meta experience. A while into the film and it became difficult for me to distinguish between Nair’s passion for films and Dungarpur’s for Nair saab’s work. Because, passion, after all has only one language and if you speak it you understand it and Shivendra Singh Dungarpur clearly does. It made me emotional to see that kind of drive for something considered unimportant and a mere commodity. Because, in my eyes, what the two men had done was save me a chunk of my history, not only as culture but as art via the very medium I love so much. How can I thank them enough for that?

I am leaving you with some of the quotes from the film that stayed with me. (might not be verbatim)

You can see a hundred years from now; you can see a certain aspect of life which was there only at the time, on that day. It means a lot. It means more than Greek Tragedy where everything is heightened beyond compare. But those very small things get so beautifully manifest (on film). It is the very, I think, soul of art of any kind.” -Kumar Shahani

(It is important for us to preserve our past because) “We have a rich past but a very poor history, whereas the West has a significant past. (Perhaps) Not a rich past, but a very significant history.” – U. R. Ananthamurthy

Before P.K.Nair, there was no one else. After P.K. Nair there is no one else.” – Shyam Benegal

As an archivist I cannot accept that we have lost forever the print of Raja Harishchandra”. – P.K. Nair

As a film lover, I cannot accept that either. But at least we had Nair saab.

I don’t remember the last time I felt so raw while watching a film.

FATEMA KAGALWALA

Aha, finally! After making headlines almost every year for all the wrong reasons, seems like GOI has finally decided to clean up the mess (like the one on the left). Plus some good news for screenwriters – instead of one, now there will be three awards. Scroll down to read it in more details.

– The selections for National Film Awards for 2009 will be implemented under the new system. The following are the new features of the re-vamped National Film Awards:

(A) 2-Tier Selection System

(i) 5 Regional Panels has been constituted for pre-selection of films

(a) North– English, Punjabi, Dogri, Urdu, Bhojpuri, Rajasthani and Central Indian Languages

(b) West – Marathi, Hindi, Gujarati & Konkani

(c) South I – Tamil and Malayalam.   South II – Kannada, Telugu and Tulu

(d) East – Bengali, Assamese, Oriya and dialects spoken in Northeast

– Each Regional Panel would comprise a Chairperson and one member (both of whom would be from outside the region) and 3 other members from with the region.

– The screenings of the Regional panel as well as the Central jury would be held in Delhi.

(ii) The Central jury would comprise Chairperson plus 10 Members, of whom 5 would be the Chairpersons of the 5 regional juries

(B) New Award Categories

(i) Audiography – The following new awards have been introduced in this category  (a) Location Sound Recordist & Sound Designer

(ii) Music Direction – An award for background Score has been introduced, in addition to an existing award for Best Music Direction (Songs)

(iii) Best screenplay and Dialogues – 3 Awards have been instituted in place of the current award, namely, award for Adapted Screenplay award for Original Screenplay and award for Dialogues

– The cash prize for several award in both feature films and non-feature films categories have been increased.

– The sitting Fee of Jury Members have been hiked from Rs.1000/- per day to Rs.2500/- per day.

– The changes have been carried out following recommendations by an Expert Committee headed by eminent filmmaker Shri Shyam Benegal for up-gradation of the National Film Awards.

– The mandate given to the Committee, constituted by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting was to re-invent the National Film Awards with a view to making them more contemporary and acceptable.

Hopefully we will have a controversy free National Awards next year!

Before you wonder which year’s National Awards, have a look at the list first. You will be tempted to say more after checking the list.

Best Film – Antaheen

Best Director – Bala ( Naan Kadavul )

Best Actor – Upendra Limaye ( Jogva)

Best Actress – Priyanka Chopra ( Fashion )

Best Actor in Supporting Role – Arjun Rampal (Rock On)

Best Actress in Supoorting Role – Kangana Ranaut (Fashion)

Best First Film of a Director – Neeraj Pandey (A Wednesday)

Best Film providing wholesome entertainment – Oye Lucky Lucky Oye

Best Childrens Film : Gubachigalu (Kannada)

Best Animation : Roadside Romeo

Best Playback Singer (male)  : Hariharan (Jogva)

Best Playback Singer (female) : Shreya Ghoshal (Antaheen & Jogva)

Best Choreography : Chinni and Rekha Prakash (Jodha Akbar – azeem-o-shaan shenshah)

Best Costume Designer – Neeta Lulla (Jodha Akbar)

Best Cinematography – Aveek Mukherjee ( Antaheen)

Best Screenplay – Sachin Kundalkar (Gandha )

Best Music Direction – Atul & Ajay (Jogva)

Best Lyrics – Anindya Bannerjee & Chandranil Bhattacharya ( Antaheen)

Best Special Effects – Mumbai Meri Jaan

Best Make Up Artist – Moorthy V ( Naan Kadavul)

Best Audiography – Pramod J Thomas ( Gandha)

So, where are we headed ?

The JURY (read culprits) – Panel was headed by Shaji N. Karun (hmmm). Members – Roshan Taneja,  H M Ramachandra, Nagma (really ?), Satyabrata Kalita, Neelakanta, Dilip Ghosh,  Swapan Mullick, Sudesh Syal, S.K. Srivastava, Archana, B. Shashi Kumar,  Subhash Sehgal, Santosh Desai and Sreelekha Mukherjee.

Who are all these people ? Can someone enlighten us ? Except few, not sure about others and their credentials.

Among the other awards are…

Best Film on National Integration – Aai Kot Nai ( Assamese)

Best Film on Social Issues – Jogva (Marathi)

Best Film on Environmental Conservation – Jianata Bhoota (Oriya)

Best Film on Family values – Little Zizou

Best Chilren’s Film Award – Gubbachigalu

Best Child Artist – Master Shams Patel ( Thanks Maa)

The Special Jury Award – Bioscope ( Malayalam)

Best Assamese Film – Mon Jai

Best Bengali Film – Shob Charitro Kalponik

Best Hindi Film – Rock On

Best Kannada Film- Vimukthi

Best Malayalam Film Thirakkada

Best Marathi Film – Harishchandrachi Factory

Best Tamil Film Veranam Airam

Best Telugu Film – 1940 Lookagramam.

Best English Film – Land Gold Women

 Best Kokborok Film – Yarwng 

Best Tulu Film  – Gaggara

In the Non-Feature film category…

Best Short Fiction Film – Stations (Emmanuel Palo. Producer – FTII)

Best Direction – Umesh Kulkarni (Three of Us)

And the award for the Best Book on Cinema is for Bollywood Melodies (Ganesh Anantharaman). Also Special Mention to The Director’s Mind (Ujjal Chakraborty).

Best Film Critic – Altaf Mazid and R K Bidur Singh.

The National Film Awards list is finally out. Earlier we confirmed few winners including Prakash Raj For Best Actor on this post. And like always, we were right. Check out the other winners.

Best Actor – Prakash Raj( Kanchivaram )

Best Actress – Uma Shree ( Gulabi Talkies )

Best Film – Kanchivaram

Best Director – Adoor Gopalakrishnan ( Naalu Pennungal – Four Women )

Best Child Actor – Sharad Goyekar ( Marathi film Tingya ) 

Best Supporting Actor – Darshan Zariwalla ( Gandhi My Father )

Best Supporting Actress – Shefali Shah (The Last Lear)

Best Lyrics – Prasoon Joshi ( Taare Zameen Par)

Best Playback Singer(Male) – Shankar Mahadevan ( Taare Zameen Par )

Best Playback Singer (Female) – Shreya Ghoshal

Best Film on National Integration – Dharam

Best Film On Family Welfare – Taare Zameen Par

Best Film For Overall Entertaintment – Chak De India

Best Screenplay – Feroze Abbas Khan ( Gandhi My Father)

Best Music – Ousepacham for Ore Kadal

Best Film (Hindi) – 1971

Best Film (English ) – The Last Lear

Best Special Effects – Sivaji

Best Art Direction – Om Shanti Om

Best Choreography – Ye Ishq Hai (Jab We Met)

Best Cinematography – Frozen ( Shanker Raman)

Best Audiography – 1971

Best Editing – Naalu Pennungal ( Malyalam)

Best Film on Social Issues – Antardwanda ( Dir – Sushil Rajpal )

Special Jury Award – Gandhi My Father

Indira Gandhi Award for Best First Film – Shivajee Chandrabhushan for Frozen

Best Book on Cinema – From Raj To Swaraj : The Non Fiction Film In India by B D Garga

Best Film Critic – V K Joseph ( Malyalam )

In the non-feature/short films category, mentioning only those few which am aware of (read friends or friends’ friend) –

Best Educational/Motivational/Instructional Film – Prarambha (Santosh Sivan)

Short Fiction Film – Udhed Bun ( Siddharth Singh)

Best Cinematography – Kramasha ( Savita Singh )

Best Audiography –  Kramasha ( Ajit Singh Rathore )

Best Music Direction – Echoes of Silence ( English/ Khasi – Zubin Garg)

For the full list of entries and winners click here.

The jury was headed by Sai Paranjpe and members included Ashok Viswanathan and Namita Gokhale. About 102 films and 106 non-feature films were considered.