Posts Tagged ‘Ritesh Shah’

As we have done in the past, this year too we are trying to source the scripts of some of the best bollywood films of the year. As most of you know, the scripts of Hollywood films are easily available online, even the unreleased ones. But we don’t have any such database of Hindi or Indian films. So that has been the primary reason for this initiative. And it has been possible only because some of the screenwriters and filmmakers have been very supportive about it. It’s only for educational purpose and much like the spirit of the blog, is a complete non-commercial exercise.

To read the scripts of best bollywood films of last few years, click here. From 2016, script of Neerja is here and Kapoor & Sons is here. Here’s the script of Pink.

pink

In bollywood trade terms, this was not a pre-release or weekend-numbers film. The title was Pink and the poster had three actresses who are really not big names. But apart from turning out to be one of the most profitable films of the year and receiving universal critical acclaim, it also gave us this year’s most powerful cinema slogan – No means no. Ritesh Shah’s writing and Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury’s direction made sure that the audience remained glued to the screen.

Happy reading!

(Please do note that this is not the final shooting draft of the film. Some dialogues were changed during the shoot. But we thought this will be a good learning exercise – to compare the notes between the film and the script)

 

Film : Pink

Director : Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury

Story : Shoojit Sircar, Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury, Ritesh Shah

Screenplay & Dialogues : Ritesh Shah

 

As we have done in the past, this year too we are trying to source the scripts of some of the best films of the year. As most of you know, the scripts of Hollywood films are easily available online, even the unreleased ones. But we don’t have any such database for Hindi or Indian films. So that has been the primary reason for this initiative. And it has been possible because some of the filmmakers have been very supportive about it. It’s only for educational purpose and much like the spirit of the blog, is a complete non-profitable exercise. Thanks to Abhishek Kapoor, Hansal Mehta and Vikramaditya Motwane, we have been able to post the script of Kai Po Che!, Shahid, Lootera – here, here and here respectively.

Nikhil Advani burst into the scene with a terrific debut, Kal Ho Na Ho. Rarely someone gets everything so pitch perfect in a debut film, and that too when done in mainstream space. But since then he has not been able to repeat its success. This year he found his mojo back with D Day, but by going out of the space in which he has been making films so far. Unlike any of his previous films, this one was a taut edge of the seat thriller, specially the flawless first half. And when every damn song looks the same in every damn film these days, he gave us one of the best set pieces in Alvida. Who says we don’t need songs in a thriller?

Thanks to Advani, we are posting two drafts of D Day – one is the first draft and the other is the shooting draft. Read, share, learn and have fun.

Film – D Day

Screenplay – Nikhil Advani, Suresh Nair, Ritesh Shah

Dialogue – Ritesh Shah, Niranjan Iyengar

It’s raining trailers and how! The theatrical trailer of Sujoy Ghosh’s Kahaani is finally out. Have a look.

Balan seems to be on Bull run and in this one she doesn’t even have a hero opposite her.

The film stars Vidya Balan, Parambrata Chattopadhyay and Nawazuddin Siddiqui.  And the writing credits include Sujoy Ghosh (story/screenplay/dialogues), Advaita Kala (story), Suresh Nair/Nikhil Vyas (Additional screenplay), Ritesh Shah (Dialogues) and Sutapa Sikdar (Dialogues) . The film has music by Vishal-Shekhar.

Here’s the official synopsis..

Vidya Bagchi arrives in Kolkata from London to find her missing husband. Seven month pregnant and alone in a festive city, she begins a relentless search for her husband. With nothing to rely on except fragment from her memories about him, all clues seem to reach a dead end when everyone tries to convince Vidya that her husband does not exist. She slowly realizes that nothing is what it seems. In a city soaked in lies, Vidya is determined to unravel the truth about her husband – for herself and her unborn child even at the cost her own life.