Posts Tagged ‘Toronto’

Kiran Rao’s directorial debut Dhobi Ghat is going to have its world premiere at  the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). It stars Aamir Khan, Prateik Babbar, Monica Dogra and Kriti Malhotra. Some new pics of the film are out…check it out…

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And here is the official synopsis of the film…

In the teeming metropolis of Mumbai, four people separated by class and language are drawn together in compelling relationships. Shai, an affluent investment banker on a sabbatical, strikes up an unusual friendship with Munna, a young and beautiful laundry boy with ambitions of being a Bollywood actor, and has a brief dalliance with Arun, a gifted painter. As they slip away from familiar moorings and drift closer together, the city finds its way into the crevices of their inner worlds.

And to read what Cameron Bailey, Co-director of TIFF, thinks about Dhobi Ghat, click here.

We posted this one earlier….Cameron Bailey on Kiran Rao’s Dhobi Ghat. And then got to know that he has written about Anurag Kashyap’s That Girl In Yellow Booots too. For those who are still wondering who is Cameron, well, he is the Co-director of Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF).

We should have put both his notes on a single post but since Dhobi Ghat is already out, this one is on That Girl In Yellow Boots. Read on…

As India’s independent film movement surges, Anurag Kashyap is at the forefront of the action. His Dev D. stripped away Bollywood’s commercial sheen to reveal a generation of urban Indians as they are today: ambitious, exciting and international. That Girl in Yellow Boots takes a hard look at those South Asians who live in between worlds. A portrait of a biracial woman trying to find her place in Bombay, it is exactly the brand of urgent, passionate filmmaking that is transforming how we think about Indian cinema.

Ruth has spent enough time in India to know how to work the system, including how to manipulate the sleazy bureaucrat at the immigration office. With her visa extended, she returns to “studying massage,” which is really a soul-squandering job servicing men at a backroom parlour. Her boyfriend, Prashant, offers no rescue from the dangers of her work. In fact, his drug use, money problems and brushes with violent criminals put her in the way of ever-present harm. But Ruth puts on a tough face and braves the risks of her challenging, urban life for one deeply personal reason: her estranged father lives somewhere in the city. As she searches for her last remaining link with her family, she falls deeper into Bombay’s underworld. But a part of Ruth seems to embrace the danger. That girl in yellow boots is a complex character: brash but sensitive, numbed to men but desperately needing to connect.

Kashyap shot the film in a mere thirteen days and it carries that anything-goes spirit. At the same time, it boasts sophisticated widescreen cinematography that pushes its characters together in the frame, compressing them against Bombay’s humid mass of concrete and people. This is an enormously stylish film, crafting intimate pockets within the city where layered performances can unfold. In both style and subject, Kashyap defines the pulse of today’s Hindi independent cinema – Hindie, if you like.

And click here for the link to the original piece.

This friday belongs to Producer Aamir Khan. Just back from the directorial debut of Anusha Rizvi’s Peepli Live. Wow! Goes straight up in our list of Top 5 films of the year. And its a tough competition there  for the films to release in the next four months. The rest four are LSD, Vihir, Udaan and Ishqiya.

Back to Kiran Rao’s directorial debut Dhobi Ghat. The film is having its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) and here is a write up by Cameron Bailey, the Co-director of the TIFF. Read on..

The rains in Mumbai are a beautiful curse. Sheets of water fall over the city, drenching and cleansing and casting vast millions in the same grey, glistening hue. Kiran Rao sets her impressive debut feature during Mumbai’s monsoon season, using the sound and visuals of the rains to bridge the divides between her characters. This is a love letter to her city, most of all to the work and art that drives Mumbai, rain or shine.

Indian superstar Aamir Khan plays Arun, a brooding painter introduced at a gallery launch of his work. Uninterested in small talk, he strikes up a flirtation with Shai, an Indian American woman visiting her family in the city. The next morning, awkwardness descends and he practically shoves her out the door. But, in the way of the Maximum City, Shai and Arun find themselves inextricably linked. They share a laundry man, a dhobi, who picks up and delivers their clothes. One of the millions of workers who keep Mumbai humming, Zohaib maintains a friendly but formal relationship with Arun. Shai, however, becomes fascinated with Zohaib and wants to follow him to the dhobi ghat, the city’s sprawling laundry district, where she hopes to indulge her photography hobby by capturing him at work.

Informed by Wong Kar-wai and Tsai Ming Liang, but directing with her own intimate sensibility, Rao draws her three characters together against the backdrop of a city that gives and takes in equal measure. In a subplot that illuminates the film’s themes, Arun discovers a series of video diaries left by the previous tenant of his apartment. In them, a young woman recounts her impressions of the city and reveals a tragedy in brief glimpses.

It took years for American independent cinema to develop its own narrative voices in contrast to Hollywood storytelling. In India, the emergence of a contemporary indie style is happening right now. Dhobi Ghat marks a major step forward for Indian filmmaking. It’s exciting that Aamir Khan and Kiran Rao are taking that step together.

And click here for the link to the original piece.

PS – Tip by Umar.

Whats Your Raashee ?The first review of Whats Your Raashee is out! This one is from Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) where the film had its premiere. And as we told you in this post, Whats Your Raashee is indeed 3hrs 20mins long. Variety confirms it. So get ready with your pillows and bean bags if you plan to catch the film!

Back to the review or mini-review. Though the review doesnt say much but click here or scroll down to read the full review. 

For an hour, “What’s Your Raashee?” — the first romantic comedy from director Ashutosh Gowariker (“Jodhaa Akbar”) — zips along on a silly premise: Returning home to Mumbai, a young and handsome Chicagoan (Harman Baweja) has 10 days to find a wife and earn Grandpa’s inheritance, lest his brother’s gambling debt bring the family down.

But as Baweja’s sweet Yogesh proceeds to “interview” each of a dozen ladies (all played by Priyanka Chopra), and the film stretches to a whopping 211 minutes, even Bollywood aficionados will consider breaking the engagement. Likable leads can’t guarantee a sizable dowry upon the pic’s Sept. 25 release.

Each with a different astrological sign (or rashee), Chopra’s prospective brides run the gamut. Girl No. 1 is ditzy; No. 2 is a hot microbiologist with, alas, a boyfriend; the gum-snapping third girl occasions a big dance number; the fourth is painfully shy, a victim of past heartbreak; the fifth is a fussy businesswoman who brings along a prenup agreement; and after the sixth, who believes in reincarnation, there are still six more to go. Two or three peppy songs prove woefully insufficient to sustain a 3½-hour trifle, however good-looking.

The film is an adaptation of the novel Kimball Ravenswood. We hated the music (Sohail Sen), the promos, and now it seems the film will complete the full circle! Should Harman Baweja look for a new career option? Think so. Its high time! And Priyanka Chopra might get her name in some record book for potraying 12 roles in a film but all she needs is just 12 scenes! Watch Kaminey, ask Vishal Bharadwaj!

The film will release in India on September 25th. Am in no hurry to book my tickets! Who knows, might have to watch it in 12 installments!