Posts Tagged ‘Gangs Of Wasseypur’

Anurag Kashyap’s two-parter Gangs Of Wasseypur has been animated by Ashutosh and Aditya Yadav. And it’s just 3.35 minute long. Good to see some fan art here in India too. The end credit with rhymes of Giridih-Jharia-Dhanbad will remind you of a familiar sound in Dhanbad – the way sharing autorickshaws call for passengers.

PT

At some point most cinema discussion always move towards that rather simple question – who’s your favourite actor in the current lot? And to answer that question, my current favourite is Pankaj Tripathi. But the tragedy is sometimes i do have to explain who this actor is. It was the same for my other favourite – Yashpal Sharma. All these actors are always good, in any bad film or bad role.

A graduate of National School Of Drama, Pankaj has been acting for quite a few years. He got his much deserved visibility with YRF’s tv show Powder in which he played Naved Ansari. And then got recognition with his portrayal of Sultan in Gangs Of Wasseypur. Since we hardly care about actors who play character roles, so it’s rare to see them in mainstream media. Much thanks to Komal Nahta who he did this long interview with Tripathi where he talks about his theatre days, village, parents’ aspirations, struggling days and much more. And it’s quite an honest interview. DO WATCH.

Tip – Aniruddh Chatterjee

@cilemasnob

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Abhishek Kapoor’s new film Kai Po Che has released today. The reviews so far have been unanimously positive. But does it mean anything beyond that – The Big picture? Over to filmmaker Hansal Mehta who connects the dots.

Kai Po che

4 reasons for not watching the increasing number of films released every week –

  1. I am perennially broke
  2. I am lazy
  3. I need to work
  4. My wife is not in the mood
  5. I am hoping I get invited for a preview/premier.

The past few weeks have been different though. The spate of films released and due for release stared at me in the face because

  1. They featured friends in lead roles
  2. They were directed by friends
  3. They were produced by friends
  4. I was looking forward to the films
  5. I felt compelled to watch them

I am going to limit my post to the Hindi films I saw because in the case of foreign films:

  1. I feel inadequate commenting about commenting on them
  2. I did not feel like watching many of them
  3. I am waiting for uncensored DVDs of some of them
  4. I don’t get invited for previews of these films

In the past few years, most significantly 2012, I am seeing a pattern in films that are successful (relatively) and appreciated. A majority of them stand out for their choice of actors, their choice of subject, their non-formulaic narratives and a host of other similarly intellectually stimulating reasons.  One factor that has begun to increasingly stand out in these films is sheer audacity. The more I think about what drew me to watch the films, to like some of them, to dislike some of them and to find some of them memorable was the lack of apologetic film-making that has mostly led our films towards pathetic levels of mediocrity.

I’ve noticed that many film-makers no longer feel pressured to make the same formulaic nonsense with the same boring people over and over again. Many of the older directors also seem to realize the futility of formula and are trying hard to reinvent. Those who aren’t will soon be history.

Ever since I made Shahid, I’ve been asked over and over again about how the trend of biopics is on the increase. The media unfortunately reads trends very poorly and looks for convenient analysis. Trade pundits who have in the past thrived upon silly generalization are very shallow in their understanding of artistic/creative decisions taken by film-makers or in analyzing the success of films that don’t fall into their formulaic comfort zones. The truth is that book adaptations, biopics and stories inspired by true events are an indicator and not trends in themselves. We now have film-makers looking for newer stories to tell. We have film-makers looking for new ways to tell stories. We have film-makers who are fearless. We have film-makers who are not afraid of audacity.

Whether it is Talaash, Gangs of Wasseypur, Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu, Vicky Donor, Special 26 or Kai Po Che, I notice a fearless streak in the directors and the team that has made these films possible. Even potboilers like Dabangg, or before that Wanted, or the recently released ABCD have displayed a certain audacious vision. Rockstar had the audacity to be deeply philosophical and sometimes mendering while pretending to have commercial trappings. A certain Anurag Kashyap whose films either got banned or termed as jinxed is now celebrated because of his delightfully indulgent Gangs of Wasseypur or his subversive take on Devdas. Sujoy Ghosh redeemed himself with the surprising Kahaani. Tigmanshu Dhulia’s Pan Singh Tomar was commercially successful. English Vinglish marked the successful return of a Bollywood diva who churned out some of the most cringe-worthy films of my growing up years. The list could be exhaustive and I’m sure it will soon dominate successful box-office lists. On the other hand there has been a steady increase in films (Ship of Theseus, Miss Lovely, Peddlers etc.) that have found appreciative audiences in international film festivals and critics. These films have shown a fierce independence in their making while giving alternate Indian cinema a new lease of life and an unpretentious, fresh form of expression. They have been audacious in their abandonment of what we perceived as ‘art-house’ or ‘parallel’ cinema in India. They were unabashed in their treatment, style, narratives and expression. These and many other films that I have viewed over the past year and this year have challenged audiences, provoked critics and subverted formulaic convention with amazing audacity. Even more encouraging is the fact that producers, actors (including some stars) and trade have begun to embrace the audacious breed, backing them to the hilt.

So what is the point I’m trying to make? It’s simple. Audacity is in. Safe is not safe anymore. Take the second installment of Dabangg. It disappointed because it succumbed to ‘ingredientization’ and failed to live up to the fearless audacity of the first part. Films like ‘Zila Ghaziabad’  or ‘Jayantabhai Ki Love Story’ are passé. They will continue to get made. They will continue to remind us of everything that is unimaginative and about how we have allowed ourselves to be taken for granted all these years.

So here is my two bit gyaan. Whether you aim for the mainstream or the alternate space, make it audacious. Just making it big will soon cease to work – neither for the makers or the audience. Yes, we will have regular installments of successful franchises. We will have ridiculous remakes. We will have mindless, story-less films – but my guess is that all of them will work for their audacity and not for their adherence to convention.

Audacious will soon be safe. Safe is already dangerous. It could soon be suicidal.

Toronto International Film Festival’s focus in this year’s ‘City To City’ program is Mumbai and its showing Manjeet Singh’s Mumbai Cha Raja (The King of Mumbai), Anand Gandhi’s Ship of Theseus, Mohit Takalkar’s The Bright Day, Hansal Mehta’s Shahid along with Anurag Kashyap’s two-parter Gangs of Wasseypur, Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely, Habib Faisal’s Ishaqzaade, Dibakar Banerjee’s Shanghai and Vasan Bala’s Peddlers.

TIFF has made the presser video online where are all the directors were present and they talk about various subjects – festival, female directors, reviews, bollywood vs indies, changing film making scenario,

16:50 onward – On reviews. Waah, Vasan!

19:80 onward – Ha! Good try, Mr Habib Faisal to defend the regressive Ishaqzaade.

39:15 – Balaji took bits and pieces from Miss Lovely and made The Dirty Picture – Ashim Ahluwalia.

40:15 – If you send a script like this, i will file a criminal complaint with the police.

Shubha Shetty is a journalist and a writer who says she is still in the process of learning the art of diplomacy. Blurting out what she feels strongly about, and then repenting at leisure is how she kills her free time. Over to her now – An open letter to Anurag Kashyap.

I like people like Anurag Kashyap. This guy comes from nowhere and in spite of adverse conditions and zero support, with the sheer dint of an enviable amount of confidence and conviction, cocks a snook at the largely untalented and hence averse to risk film-makers. He does what he wants to. Without any compromise. Who doesn’t love an immensely talented underdog?

A decade later, his talent still shines bright. Watch Gangs of Wasseypur part I and you will need no further proof. And admirably he continues to use the power he has gathered over the years, in supporting other deserving film-makers.

But unfortunately, the very power has changed the man in a not so nice manner too. In recent times we have been witness to an unbridled bully, hidden inside this otherwise grounded man, rearing its ugly head once in a while This bully also attempts to cock a snook at his critics, but with not the same amount of confidence, also this one seems to operate more from ego than earnestness.

It is this bully who tells entertainment journalists that they shouldn’t care to criticise him because he has stopped reading entertainment supplements long back, but then we see him paying (?) and posing for an entertainment supplement of a leading newspaper.

I am more disheartened that this bully seems to be forcing entry into his films too. While Gangs of Wasseypur part II is excellent in parts as expected, you see unmissable traces of cockiness of the director in the form of self-indulgent long sequences and unexplained trail of characters.

To me, Kashyap now seems like this super brilliant boy from small town, an outsider, wasting his energy trying silly antics to just prove a point to a posh but mediocre group of city bred teenagers in college. I am concerned, like perhaps an old friend of that boy would be. After all, the friend knows that this boy can do wonders, only if he just stayed true to the genius that he’s blessed with.

But now that’s my opinion.

You decide which path you want to take, Mr. Kashyap. Do you want to be that all powerful, all successful film-maker who thinks he can sway people’s opinion by pushing his way through, with little help from his newly acquired sycophantic coterie or you want to continue being the awe inspiring film maker that you were, without wasting even an ounce of energy over thinking how powerful your craft and talent makes you.

You are already a successful and admirable man. It is time you stopped proving points to anyone. In the meanwhile, as much as I despise that bully inside you, I am still holding on to that faith I have on you. I am sure millions of others are too.

QOTD : Gangs Of Wasseypur – Part 1 or 2?

Posted: August 9, 2012 by moifightclub in cinema, QOTD
Tags: ,

The second part of Anurag Kashyap’s two-parter Gangs Of Wasseypur has finally released. Once you have seen both the parts, then only you can imagine how daunting task it must have been to make these two films, and still hit the right notes at the right places. (Aha, we will be again accused of being biased for his films. Not a single day passes without the accusation anyway.)

The opinion is still divided on whether 1 is better or 2, but one thing is for sure 1+2 = Epic Masterclass in Filmmaking! A rare feat which only few can dare to imagine and then translate it onscreen into cinematic orgasm of almost 6hours. There are few theatres across the country which are showing both the parts back to back (see pics). If you can, you must go for one of these marathons.

And so here’s our QOTD – Pick your favourites. If you are bit confused with who played which character, click here to access the family chart and then vote.

As for me, i would say Part 1 was like wine – slow, smooth and acquired taste. Part 2 is like beer – fast, popcorn-ish and fun! Full dhickiyaoon!

Do put your reasons in the comments section. Let the gang war begin!

Toronto International Film festival (TIFF) has announced 10 Indian films in its “City to City” segment where the focus this year is Mumbai.

Out of the selected ten films, four film will have its world premiere at TIFF. These four are Manjeet Singh’s Mumbai Cha Raja (The King of Mumbai), Anand Gandhi’s Ship of Theseus, Mohit Takalkar’s The Bright Day and Hansal Mehta’s Shahid. The other six includes Anurag Kashyap’s two-parter Gangs of Wasseypur, Ashim Ahluwalia’s Miss Lovely, Habib Faisal’s Ishaqzaade, Dibakar Banerjee’s Shanghai and Vasan Bala’s Peddlers.

Since we have been covering Gangs Of Wasseypur, Miss Lovely, Peddlers, Ishaqzaade and Sanghai extensively, we are going to put out the info about the rest of the films now.

—> Shahid. Director : Hansal Mehta

Shahid is the remarkable true story of slain human rights activist and lawyer Shahid Azmi, who was killed in 2010 by unidentified assailants in his office. From attempting to become a terrorist, to being wrongly imprisoned under a draconian anti-terrorism law, to becoming a champion of human rights (particularly of the Muslim minorities in India), Shahid traces the inspiring personal journey of a boy who became an unlikely messiah for human rights, while following the rise of communal violence in India. This story of an impoverished Muslim struggling to come to terms with injustice and inequality, whilerising above his circumstances is an inspiring testament to the human spirit. Starring Raj Kumar, Prabhleen Sandhu and Baljinder Kaur.

—> Mumbai’s King (Mumbai Cha Raja). Director : Manjeet Singh


Rahul roams the streets with his balloon-seller friend Arbaaz. These two kids escape the grim realities of their lives by gambling, roasting stolen potatoes, stealing an auto rickshaw for a joyride, and chasing girls. But soon Rahul has to “take care” of his violent father, who has forced him to live on streets. Starring Rahul Bairagi, Arbaaz Khan and Tejas Parvatkar.

—> Ship of Theseus. Director : Anand Gandhi

For Poster, Stills and Official synopsis of the film, click here.

—> The Bright Day. Director : Mohit Takalkar

Yearning for meaning in his life, a coddled young man abandons his girlfriend and family to set out on a spiritual quest across India. Shot with sophisticated DSLR cameras and reflecting a new passion for personal filmmaking, The Bright Day finds images to chart a soul’s progress.